Tag Archives: Biotechnology (Ethics)

* Nottingham Dollies prove cloned sheep can live long and healthy lives

Three weeks after the scientific world marked the 20th anniversary of the birth of Dolly the sheep new research, published by The University of Nottingham, in the academic journal Nature Communications has shown that four clones derived from the same cell line — genomic copies of Dolly — reached their 8th birthdays in good health. […]

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Scientists grow mini human brains

Scientists in Singapore have made a big leap on research on the ‘mini-brain’. These advanced mini versions of the human midbrain will help researchers develop treatments and conduct other studies into Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and aging-related brain diseases. These mini midbrain versions are three-dimensional miniature tissues that are grown in the laboratory and they have […]

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Artificial pancreas likely to be available by 2018

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  The artificial pancreas — a device which monitors blood glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes and then automatically adjusts levels of insulin entering the body — is likely to be available by 2018, conclude authors of a paper in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes). Issues such […]

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Electronic nose smells pesticides, nerve gas

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The best-known electronic nose is the breathalyser. As drivers breathe into the device, a chemical sensor measures the amount of alcohol in their breath. This chemical reaction is then converted into an electronic signal, allowing the police officer to read off the result. Alcohol is easy to detect, because the chemical reaction is specific and […]

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Cats seem to grasp the laws of physics

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Cats understand the principle of cause and effect as well as some elements of physics. Combining these abilities with their keen sense of hearing, they can predict where possible prey hides. These are the findings of researchers from Kyoto University in Japan, led by Saho Takagi and published in Springer’s journal Animal Cognition. Previous work […]

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Artificial synapse rivals biological ones in energy consumption

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Creation of an artificial intelligence system that fully emulates the functions of a human brain has long been a dream of scientists. A brain has many superior functions as compared with super computers, even though it has light weight, small volume, and consumes extremely low energy. This is required to construct an artificial neural network, […]

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US government issues historic $3.5-million fine over animal welfare

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Antibody provider Santa Cruz Biotechnology settles with government after complaints about treatment of goats. Santa Cruz Biotech has used goats to produce antibodies. The US government has fined Santa Cruz Biotechnology, a major antibody provider, US$3.5 million over alleged violations of the US Animal Welfare Act. The penalty from the US Department of Agriculture is […]

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Targeting metals to fight pathogenic bacteria

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Researchers at the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS) at Umeå University in Sweden participated in the discovery of a unique system of acquisition of essential metals in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This research was led by scientists at the CEA in France, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Pau, the […]

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Individualized cancer treatment targeting the tumor, not the whole body, a step closer

They look like small, translucent gems but these tiny ‘gel’ slivers hold the world of a patient’s tumour in microcosm ready for trials of anti-cancer drugs to find the best match between treatment and tumour. The ‘gel’ is a new 3D printable material developed by QUT researchers that opens the way to rapid, personalised cancer […]

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* Functional heart muscle regenerated in decellularized human hearts

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A partially recellularized human whole-heart cardiac scaffold, reseeded with human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, being cultured in a bioreactor that delivers a nutrient solution and replicates some of the environmental conditions around a living heart. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have taken some initial steps toward the creation of bioengineered human hearts […]

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* Popular stem cell techniques deemed safe; unlikely to pass on cancer-causing mutations

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) shows that the act of creating pluripotent stem cells for clinical use is unlikely to pass on cancer-causing mutations to patients. The research, published February 19, 2016 in the journal Nature Communications, is an important step […]

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Biotech giant publishes failures to confirm high-profile science

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A biotechnology firm is releasing data on three failed efforts to confirm findings in high-profile scientific journals — details that the industry usually keeps secret. Amgen, headquartered in Thousand Oaks, California, says that it hopes the move will encourage others in industry and academia to describe their own replication attempts, and thus help the scientific […]

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Legal tussle delays launch of huge toxicity database

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A database of the toxicity of nearly 10,000 chemicals might reduce the need for animal safety-testing. A giant database on the health risks of nearly 10,000 chemicals will make it easier to predict the toxicity of tens of thousands of consumer products for which no data exist, say researchers. But a legal disagreement means they […]

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Researchers create ‘mini-brains’ in lab to study neurological diseases

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Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have developed tiny “mini-brains” made up of many of the neurons and cells of the human brain — and even some of its functionality — and which can be replicated on a large scale. The researchers say that the creation of these “mini-brains,” […]

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* Microchip used to build a first-ever artificial kidney

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Vanderbilt University Medical Center nephrologist and associate professor of medicine Dr. William H. Fissell IV, is making major progress on a first-of-its kind device to free kidney patients from dialysis. He is building an implantable artificial kidney with microchip filters and living kidney cells that will be powered by a patient’s own heart. “We are […]

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A new method to dramatically improve the sequencing of metagenomes

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An international team of computer scientists developed a method that greatly improves researchers’ ability to sequence the DNA of organisms that can’t be cultured in the lab, such as microbes living in the human gut or bacteria living in the depths of the ocean. They published their work in the Feb. 1 issue of Nature […]

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Completely new kind of polymer could lead to artificial muscles, self-repairing materials

Imagine a polymer with removable parts that can deliver something to the environment and then be chemically regenerated to function again. Or a polymer that can lift weights, contracting and expanding the way muscles do. These functions require polymers with both rigid and soft nano-sized compartments with extremely different properties that are organized in specific […]

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* Dog domestication may have increased harmful genetic changes, biologists report

The domestication of dogs may have inadvertently caused harmful  genetic changes, a UCLA-led study suggests. Domesticating dogs from gray wolves more than 15,000 years ago involved artificial selection and inbreeding, but the effects of these processes on dog genomes have been little-studied. UCLA researchers analyzed the complete genome sequences of 19 wolves; 25 wild dogs […]

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First puppies born by in vitro fertilization

First puppies born by in vitro fertilization VetScite News, January 13, 2016

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* First puppies born by in vitro fertilization

For the first time, a litter of puppies was born by in vitro fertilization, thanks to work by Cornell University researchers. The breakthrough, described in a study to be published online Dec. 9 in the journal Public Library of Science ONE, opens the door for conserving endangered canid species, using gene-editing technologies to eradicate heritable […]

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* Nanotechnology advances could pave way for implantable artificial kidney

A surgically implantable, artificial kidney could be a promising alternative to kidney transplantation or dialysis for people with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Currently, more than 20 million Americans have kidney diseases, and more than 600,000 patients are receiving treatment for ESRD. U.S. government statistics indicate kidney care costs the U.S. health care system $40 […]

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Test tube foals that could help ensure rare breed survival

The recent birth of two test tube foals in the UK, as part of a collaborative project conducted by leading fertility experts, could help benefit rare breed conservation and horses with fertility problems. The births mark the successful completion of a three-year program, the aim of which was to establish and offer advanced breeding methods […]

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Artificial foam heart created

Cornell University researchers have developed a new lightweight and stretchable material with the consistency of memory foam that has potential for use in prosthetic body parts, artificial organs and soft robotics. The foam is unique because it can be formed and has connected pores that allow fluids to be pumped through it. The polymer foam […]

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Investigators create complex kidney structures from human stem cells derived from adults

New technique offers model for studying disease, progress toward cell therapy. Researchers modeled kidney development and injury in kidney organoids (shown here), demonstrating that the organoid culture system can be used to study mechanisms of human kidney development and toxicity. Investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have […]

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An accessible approach to making a mini-brain

If you need a working miniature brain — say for drug testing, to test neural tissue transplants, or to experiment with how stem cells work — a new paper describes how to build one with what the Brown University authors say is relative ease and low expense. The little balls of brain aren’t performing any […]

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Self-propelled powder designed to stop severe bleeding

UBC researchers have created the first self-propelled particles capable of delivering coagulants against the flow of blood to treat severe bleeding, a potentially huge advancement in trauma care. “Bleeding is the number one killer of young people, and maternal death from postpartum hemorrhage can be as high as one in 50 births in low resource […]

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Sensor could detect viruses, kill cancer cells

MIT biological engineers have developed a modular system of proteins that can detect a particular DNA sequence in a cell and then trigger a specific response, such as cell death. This system can be customized to detect any DNA sequence in a mammalian cell and then trigger a desired response, including killing cancer cells or […]

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New ‘Tissue Velcro’ could help repair damaged hearts

Engineers at the University of Toronto just made assembling functional heart tissue as easy as fastening your shoes. The team has created a biocompatible scaffold that allows sheets of beating heart cells to snap together just like Velcro™. “One of the main advantages is the ease of use,” says biomedical engineer Professor Milica Radisic, who […]

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Next-generation X-ray source fires up

Sweden’s MAX-IV laboratory will host the first two ‘fourth-generation’ light sources. Electrons have begun circulating in a synchrotron in Lund, Sweden, in what researchers hope marks the start of a new era for X-ray science. Synchrotrons are particle accelerators that produce X-rays used in research ranging from structural biology to materials science. The next generation […]

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Non-invasive device could end daily finger pricking for people with diabetes

A new laser sensor that monitors blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin could transform the lives of millions of people living with diabetes. A new laser sensor that monitors blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin could transform the lives of millions of people living with diabetes Currently, many people with diabetes need to […]

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