Tag Archives: Bovine

Contraception program effectively manages bison population

The wild bison roaming Catalina Island are a major attraction for the nearly 1 million tourists who visit the Channel Island’s most popular destination every year. But managing the number of bison so that the herd remains healthy and doesn’t endanger the health of the rest of the Island has been a major challenge for […]

Tags: ,

The prevalence of colds and pneumonia in cows can be controlled

Respiratory diseases in cattle are a great threat to animal welfare and lead to financial losses in the cattle industry. The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is one of the main causes of respiratory disease in cattle. A study of the prevalence and infection distribution of the virus shows that it is possible to control […]

Tags: ,

Foot and mouth disease in sub-Saharan Africa moves over short distances, wild buffalo

New research shows that in sub-Saharan Africa the virus responsible for foot and mouth disease (FMD) moves over relatively short distances and the African buffalo are important natural reservoirs for the infection. The study, published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, sheds light on how the type of FMD […]

Tags: ,

African breed of cattle harbors potential defense against life-threatening parasite

Every year, millions of cattle die of trypanosomosis. The UN and the International Livestock Research Institute list trypanosomosis among the ten diseases of cattle with the greatest impact on the poor. In Africa the disease is known as “Nagana,” which translates literally as “being in low or depressed spirits.” The disease is caused by a […]

Tags: ,

Hormone disruptors rise from the dead

The vast amounts of steroids that are fed to cattle in some countries end up in farm run-off and may affect the environment even after they are broken down by sunlight. Hormone-disrupting chemicals may be far more prevalent in lakes and rivers than previously thought. Environmental scientists have discovered that although these compounds are often […]

Tags: ,

Vaccinating cattle against the E. coli O157 bacterium could cut the number of human cases of the disease by 85%, according to scientists

The bacteria, which cause severe gastrointestinal illness and even death in humans, are spread by consuming contaminated food and water, or by contact with livestock feces in the environment. Cattle are the main reservoir for the bacterium. The vaccines that are available for cattle are rarely used, but could be significant. The research was lead […]

Tags: ,

Divergent astrovirus associated with neurologic disease in cattle

Using viral metagenomics of brain tissue from a young adult crossbreed steer with acute onset of neurologic disease, we sequenced the complete genome of a novel astrovirus (BoAstV-NeuroS1) that was phylogenetically related to an ovine astrovirus. In a retrospective analysis of 32 cases of bovine encephalitides of unknown etiology, 3 other infected animals were detected […]

Tags: ,

Antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella tracked from farm to fork

Continuing research on Salmonella may enable researchers to identify and track strains of antibiotic resistant bacteria as they evolve and spread, according to researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. Tracing the transmission of individual strains from agricultural environments to humans through the food system is difficult because of the rapid evolution of resistance […]

Tags: ,

Whole genome sequencing provides researchers with a better understanding of bovine TB outbreaks

The use of whole bacterial genome sequencing will allow scientists to inexpensively track how bovine tuberculosis (TB) is transmitted from farm to farm, according to research presented this week at the Society of General Microbiology Autumn Conference. Bovine TB is primarily a disease of cattle, caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis. The disease is hugely […]

Tags: ,

MRSA strain in humans originally came from cattle

A strain of bacteria that causes skin and soft tissue infections in humans originally came from cattle, according to a study to be published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The researchers who conducted the genetic analysis of strains of Staphylococcus aureus known as CC97 say these strains developed […]

Tags: ,

Rinderpest research restarts

Rinderpest has been eradicated, but vigilance and surveillance are needed to ensure it doesn’t come back. Research is set to resume on the rinderpest virus, the cause of a deadly cattle disease that was declared eradicated in 2011 and has been off limits for study ever since. The moratorium — part of efforts to guard […]

Tags: ,

Survey shows increase in resistance to drug therapies among bovine respiratory disease cases

Posted on

A survey of records of bovine respiratory disease cases at the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory showed that drug resistance in one of the primary pathogens that cause BRD, Mannheimia haemolytica, increased over a three-year period. “We have been seeing an increase in the number of antibiotic resistant bacteria that cause pneumonia (also called BRD) […]

Tags: ,

Unusual antibodies in cows suggest new ways to make medicines for people

Posted on

Humans have been raising cows for their meat, hides and milk for millennia. Now it appears that the cow immune system also has something to offer. A new study led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) focusing on an extraordinary family of cow antibodies points to new ways to make human medicines. “These […]

Tags: ,

Vets and medical doctors should team up to tackle diseases transmitted from animals to humans

Posted on

A new study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) in Antwerp analyses the impact of animal brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTB) on animals and people in urban, peri-urban and rural Niger. The World Health Organization (WHO) ranks them as major zoonoses, infectious diseases transmitted between species. The research maps risk factors for transmission of […]

Tags: ,

Synthetic vaccine could prevent future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease

Virologists have devised a way to create an entirely synthetic vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease. The vaccine could prevent future outbreaks of the disease, and potentially lead to new treatments for polio and other human diseases. Bryan Charleston, head of the Livestock Viral Diseases Programme at the Pirbright Institute in Woking, UK, and his colleagues used […]

Tags: ,

Cows fed flaxseed produce more nutritious dairy products

Dairy cows that are fed flaxseed produce more nutritious milk, according to a new study by Oregon State University. Their milk contained more omega-3 fatty acids and less saturated fat, the study found. Diets high in saturated fat can increase cholesterol and cause heart disease, while those rich in omega-3 and other polyunsaturated fatty acids […]

Tags: ,

In beef production, cow-calf phase contributes most greenhouse gases

Scientists have long known that cattle produce carbon dioxide and methane throughout their lives, but a new study pinpoints the cow-calf stage as a major contributor of greenhouse gases during beef production. In a new paper for the Journal of Animal Science, scientists estimate greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle during different stages of life. […]

Tags: ,

Beef industry, consumers to be affected by cattle production decreases in 2013

Beef production in the United States is expected to decrease 4.8 percent in 2013, the second largest year-over-year decrease in 35 years, trailing only the 6.4 percent drop in 2004. The reason is a combination of mostly steady carcass weights and a projected 5 percent or more decrease in cattle slaughter, said Derrell Peel, Oklahoma […]

Tags: ,

Brain inflammation likely key initiator to prion and Parkinson’s disease

In a recent publication, researchers of the Computational Biology group at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine showed that neuro-inflammation plays a crucial role in initiating prion disease. Prion diseases represent a family of neurodegenerative disorders associated with the loss of brain cells and caused by proteins called prions (derived from ‘protein’ and ‘infection’). The […]

Tags: ,

A cow in New Zealand has been genetically modified to produce hypoallergenic milk

Two genetically engineered farm animals reported today illustrate how far from Frankenstein’s stitched-together monster animal biotechnology has come. One of those animals, a cow, secretes milk that lacks an allergy-inducing protein because researchers accurately blocked its production using the technique of RNA interference. And in pigs, scientists have used an enzyme called a TALEN to […]

Tags: ,

Excessive summertime heat can shorten gestation time for beef cattle

Southern Plains cow-calf producers with fall-calving herds should be watching out for any incidence of premature births this August. Research conducted by Oklahoma State University’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources indicates that excessively hot summertime temperatures — all too normal for the south-central region of the United States — can shorten the gestation […]

Tags: ,

Officials act to secure cattle-plague virus

Rinderpest, a devastating cattle disease, has not been seen in the wild for a decade, but it lives on in scores of labs. Twelve months after the world celebrated the success of a years-long vaccination campaign that made rinderpest only the second disease after smallpox to be eradicated, animal-health authorities are turning to the next […]

Tags: , ,

Novel vaccine for strain of foot-and-mouth disease

Posted on

One of the most economically devastating diseases in the world for those who raise cows, sheep, pigs, goats, deer and other cloven-hoofed animals is foot and mouth Disease (FMD). This incredibly contagious and fast-spreading disease causes fever, blisters on the feet and mouth (hence the name), loss of appetite, drooling, and lameness. Most herds affected […]

Tags: ,

Study finds ‘mad cow disease’ in cattle can spread widely in ANS before detectable in CNS

Posted on

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or “mad cow disease”) is a fatal disease in cattle that causes portions of the brain to turn sponge-like. This transmissible disease is caused by the propagation of a misfolded form of protein known as a prion, rather than by a bacterium or virus. The average time from infection to signs […]

Tags: ,

Milking cows 7000 years ago

Posted on

The first unequivocal evidence that humans in prehistoric Saharan Africa used cattle for their milk nearly 7,000 years ago is described in research by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, UK, published June 20 in Nature. By analysing fatty acids extracted from unglazed pottery excavated from an archaeological site in […]

Tags: , ,

Bovine TB disguised by liver fluke

Posted on

Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) could be spreading across Britain because the most widely used test for the disease is ineffective when cattle are infected with a common liver parasite. The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica was already known to affect the standard skin test for bTB, but it was unclear whether the fluke stopped the disease developing […]

Tags: ,

Seroprevalence of Schmallenberg virus antibodies among dairy cattle, the Netherlands, winter 2011–2012

Posted on

Infections with Schmallenberg virus (SBV) are associated with congenital malformations in ruminants. Because reporting of suspected cases only could underestimate the true rate of infection, we conducted a seroprevalence study in the Netherlands to detect past exposure to SBV among dairy cattle. A total of 1,123 serum samples collected from cattle during November 2011–January 2012 […]

Tags: ,

California BSE prion comes with a different twist

Posted on

Reports of ‘mad cow’ disease in the United States erupted in the news this week after the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed that the remains of a California dairy cow had tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). This marks the fourth case of BSE identified in the US, and the first case in […]

Tags: ,

Schmallenberg virus in calf born at term with porencephaly

From the end of August through the end of October 2011, a clinical syndrome involving adult cattle and the fetuses of pregnant cows emerged in the border area between the Netherlands and North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The syndrome was characterized by nonspecific clinical signs (fever, decreased milk production), severe diarrhea, and some abortions. A metagenomic analysis […]

Tags: ,

DNA traces cattle back to a small herd domesticated around 10,500 years ago

All cattle are descended from as few as 80 animals that were domesticated from wild ox in the Near East some 10,500 years ago, according to a new genetic study. An international team of scientists from the CNRS and National Museum of Natural History in France, the University of Mainz in Germany, and UCL in […]

Tags: , ,

Sidebar