Tag Archives: Dentistry

Preventing dental implant infections

One million dental implants are inserted every year in Germany, and often they need to be replaced due to issues such as tissue infections caused by bacteria. In the future, these infections will be prevented thanks to a new plasma implant coating that kills pathogens using silver ions. Bacterial infection of a dental implant is […]

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BPA harms dental enamel in young animals, mimicking human tooth defect

A tooth enamel abnormality in children, molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH), may result from exposure to the industrial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), authors of a new study conclude after finding similar damage to the dental enamel of rats that received BPA. BPA is an endocrine disruptor, or hormone-altering chemical, that has been linked to numerous adverse […]

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Cat dentals fill you with dread?

A survey published this year found that over 50% of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don’t always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many […]

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Key enzyme found in disease-causing bacteria responsible for heart valve disease

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A disease-causing bacterium found in the mouth needs manganese, a trace mineral, in order to cause a serious heart infection, according to a preclinical study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Philips Institute for Oral Health Research in the School of Dentistry. The findings, which may solve a longstanding mystery of why some bacteria […]

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Biological tooth replacement is a step closer

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Scientists have developed a new method of replacing missing teeth with a bioengineered material generated from a person’s own gum cells. Current implant-based methods of whole tooth replacement fail to reproduce a natural root structure and as a consequence of the friction from eating and other jaw movement, loss of jaw bone can occur around […]

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Ancient tooth may provide evidence of early human dentistry

Researchers may have uncovered new evidence of ancient dentistry in the form of a 6,500-year-old human jaw bone with a tooth showing traces of beeswax filling, as reported Sept. 19 in the open access journal PLOS ONE. The researchers, led by Federico Bernardini and Claudio Tuniz of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics […]

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Scientists discover mutations associated with skin disorder (DSAP)

A Chinese research team, led by Anhui Medical University and BGI, has found strong genetic evidence of a link between mutations of the mevalonate kinase gene (MVK) and disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP). It is a major step toward discovering the genetic pathogenesis of DSAP, and sheds light on its further molecular diagnosis and treatment. […]

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Dental fillings that kill bacteria and re-mineralize the tooth

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Scientists using nanotechology at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry have created the first cavity-filling composite that kills harmful bacteria and regenerates tooth structure lost to bacterial decay. Rather than just limiting decay with conventional fillings, the new composite is a revolutionary dental weapon to control harmful bacteria, which co-exist in the natural colony […]

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Preventing bacteria from falling in with the wrong crowd could help stop gum disease

Stripping some mouth bacteria of their access key to gangs of other pathogenic oral bacteria could help prevent gum disease and tooth loss. The study, published in the journal Microbiology suggests that this bacterial access key could be a drug target for people who are at high risk of developing gum disease. Oral bacteria called […]

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Dental medicine team describes how enamel forms

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine are piecing together the process of tooth enamel biomineralization, which could lead to novel nanoscale approaches to developing biomaterials. The findings are reported online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dental enamel is the most mineralized tissue in the body […]

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Enzyme responsible for dental plaque sticking to teeth deciphered

The Groningen professors Bauke Dijkstra and Lubbert Dijkhuizen have deciphered the structure and functional mechanism of the glucansucrase enzyme that is responsible for dental plaque sticking to teeth. This knowledge will stimulate the identification of substances that inhibit the enzyme. Just add that substance to toothpaste, or even sweets, and caries will be a thing […]

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Tissue engineering technique yields potential biological substitute for dental implants

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A technique pioneered in the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory of Dr. Jeremy Mao, the Edward V. Zegarelli Professor of Dental Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center, can orchestrate stem cells to migrate to a three-dimensional scaffold infused with growth factor, holding the translational potential to yield an anatomically correct tooth in as soon […]

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Melanoma not caused by early ultraviolet (UVA) light exposure, new fish experiments show

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Early life exposure to ultraviolet A light does not cause melanoma in a fish model that previously made that connection, scientists from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. UVA exposure is unlikely to have contributed to the rise […]

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Painless plasma jets could reduce the amount of dental bacteria

Plasma jets capable of obliterating tooth decay-causing bacteria could be an effective and less painful alternative to the dentist’s drill, according to a new study published in the February issue of the Journal of Medical Microbiology. Firing low temperature plasma beams at dentin – the fibrous tooth structure underneath the enamel coating – was found […]

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Cracking the root of tooth strength

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After years of biting and chewing, how are human teeth able to remain intact and functional? A team of researchers from The George Washington University and other international scholars have discovered several features in enamel—the outermost tooth tissue—that contribute to the resiliency of human teeth. Human enamel is brittle. Like glass, it cracks easily; but […]

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Scientists find link between inflamed gums and heart disease

The next person who reminds you to floss might be your cardiologist instead of your dentist. Scientists have known for some time that a protein associated with inflammation (CRP) is elevated in people who are at risk for heart disease. But where’s the inflammation coming from? A new research study by Italian and U.K. scientists […]

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Presence of gum disease may help dentists and physicians identify risk for cardiovascular disease

Individuals reporting a history of periodontal disease were more likely to have increased levels of inflammation, a risk factor for heart disease, compared to those who reported no history of periodontal disease, according to an American Journal of Cardiology report available online. Led by investigators from Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, the findings […]

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Stem cells from monkey teeth can stimulate growth and generation of brain cells

Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have discovered dental pulp stem cells can stimulate growth and generation of several types of neural cells. Findings from this study, available in the October issue of the journal Stem Cells, suggest dental pulp stem cells show promise for use in cell therapy and regenerative […]

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Researchers use a patient’s own bone to accelerate orthodontics

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Researchers at the University of Southern California School of Dentistry say they have improved upon a surgical procedure developed by periodontist Tom Wilcko that rapidly straightens teeth, delivering a healthy bite and attractive smile in months instead of years. Led by Hessam Nowzari DDS, PhD, Director of the USC School of Dentistry and Advanced Education […]

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Good dental hygiene may help prevent heart infection

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Good dental hygiene and health may be crucial in preventing heart valve infection, according to research reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. In a study of 290 dental patients, researchers investigated several measures of bacteremia (bacteria released into the bloodstream) during three different dental activities — tooth brushing, a single tooth extraction […]

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Porous structures help boost integration of host tissue with implants

Researchers at Columbia University, including Jeremy Mao of the Columbia College of Dental Medicine, have demonstrated a novel way of using porous structures as a drug-delivery vehicle that can help boost the integration of host tissue with surgically implanted titanium. Instead of being acted upon by the body as an impenetrable foreign object, the synthetic […]

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No tooth brush, no cavities?

Bacteria that eat sugar and release cavity-causing acid onto teeth may soon be made dramatically more vulnerable to their own acid. Researchers have identified key genes and proteins that, if interfered with, can take away the ability of a key bacterial species to thrive as its acidic waste builds up in the mouth. The ability […]

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Laser used to help fight root canal bacteria

High-tech dental lasers used mainly to prepare cavities for restoration now can help eliminate bacteria in root canals, according to research published in the July issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA). The study, conducted by researchers in Austria, credits the development of miniaturized, flexible fiber tips for allowing the laser to […]

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Dentists need more training in oral cancer detection

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More than 92 percent of Illinois dentists provide oral cancer examinations for their patients, but many are not performing the procedures thoroughly or at optimum intervals, according to a new University of Illinois at Chicago study. With an incomplete understanding of the nature of pre-malignant lesions and of proper examination techniques, some dentists in Illinois […]

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New nanocomposites may mean more durable tooth fillings

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The mouth is a tough environment–which is why dentists do not give lifetime guarantees. Despite their best efforts, a filling may eventually crack under the stress of biting, chewing and teeth grinding, or secondary decay may develop where the filling binds to the tooth. Fully 70 percent of all dental procedures involve replacements to existing […]

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Handheld instrument assesses dental disease in minutes

Who would have guessed that when the Star Trek medical diagnostic tool known as the tricorder makes its appearance in real life, the first user might be . . . your dentist. According to a paper in the March 27 issue of PNAS (the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences), a recently completed pilot […]

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Growing dental enamel from cultured cells

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Dental enamel is the hardest tissue produced by the body. It cannot regenerate itself, because it is formed by a layer of cells that is lost by the time the tooth appears in the mouth. The enamel spends the remainder of its lifetime vulnerable to wear, damage, and decay. For this reason, it is exciting […]

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Lab-grown replacement teeth fill the gap

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Takashi Tsuji at the Tokyo University of Science, Japan, and his colleagues took single-tooth mesenchymal and epithelial cells – the two cell types that develop into a tooth – from mouse embryos. They stimulated these cells to multiply before injecting them into a drop of collagen gel. Within days, the cells formed tooth buds – […]

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Tooth decay probe

Tooth decay often goes undetected until too late. Early signs of damage are usually hidden from sight and it is unhealthy to take too many X-rays. Now researchers working for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US have discovered that infrared light – with a wavelength of 1310 nanometres – can pass straight […]

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Immune cells may damage teeth

The immune system may contribute to tooth loss associated with the gum disease periodontitis, according to a new study in the American Journal of Pathology. By comparing markers in diseased gum tissue samples to samples from healthy patients, the authors found that B-cells and T-cells in gum lesions were producing a key protein known to […]

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