Tag Archives: Diagnostic Imaging (Radiography)

* Brain’s chemical signals seen in real time

Neuroscientists have invented a way to watch the ebb and flow of the brain’s chemical messengers in real time. They were able to see the surge of neurotransmitters as mice were conditioned — similarly to Pavlov’s famous dogs — to salivate in response to a sound. The study, presented at the American Chemical Society’s meeting […]

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Imaging technique could help focus breast cancer treatment

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Cancer Research UK scientists have used imaging techniques as a new way to identify patients who could benefit from certain breast cancer treatments, according to a study published in Oncotarget. The team at King’s College London, in collaboration with scientists at the CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, used fluorescence lifetime imaging to confirm if […]

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* 3-D-printed kidney helps doctors save woman’s organ during complicated tumor removal

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Doctors and scientists at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City printed and used a 3D kidney to help save a patient’s organ during a complicated tumor-removal procedural. The 3D-printed model allowed doctors to study the patient’s kidney in 3D to determine how to best remove the tumor as it was located in a precarious […]

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* ‘Camera pill’ to examine horses

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Veterinary and engineering researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) have teamed up to harness imaging technology to fill in a blank area in animal health — what goes on in a horse’s gut? “Whenever I talk to students about the horse abdomen, I put up a picture of a horse and put […]

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New imaging method makes gall bladder removals, other procedures more safe

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UCLA researchers have discovered an optimal way to image the bile ducts during gallbladder removal surgeries using a tested and safe dye and a real-time near-infrared florescence laparoscopic camera, a finding that will make the procedure much safer for the hundreds of thousands of people who undergo the procedure each year. The new imaging procedure […]

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Personalized heart models for surgical planning

System can convert MRI scans into 3-D-printed, physical models in a few hours. Researchers at MIT and Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a system that can take MRI scans of a patient’s heart and, in a matter of hours, convert them into a tangible, physical model that surgeons can use to plan surgery. The models […]

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Scientists visualize critical part of basal ganglia pathways

Certain diseases, like Parkinson’s and Huntingdon’s disease, are associated with damage to the pathways between the brain’s basal ganglia regions. The basal ganglia sits at the base of the brain and is responsible for, among other things, coordinating movement. It is made up of four interconnected, deep brain structures that imaging techniques have previously been […]

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‘Memory region’ of brain also involved in conflict resolution

The hippocampus in the brain’s temporal lobe is responsible for more than just long-term memory. Researchers have for the first time demonstrated that it is also involved in quick and successful conflict resolution. The team headed by Prof Dr Nikolai Axmacher from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), together with colleagues from the University Hospital of Bonn […]

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Scientists visualize critical part of basal ganglia pathways

Certain diseases, like Parkinson’s and Huntingdon’s disease, are associated with damage to the pathways between the brain’s basal ganglia regions. The basal ganglia sits at the base of the brain and is responsible for, among other things, coordinating movement. It is made up of four interconnected, deep brain structures that imaging techniques have previously been […]

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* DNA damage seen in patients undergoing CT scanning, study finds

Using new laboratory technology, scientists have shown that cellular damage is detectable in patients after CT scanning, according to a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. “We now know that even exposure to small amounts of radiation from computed tomagraphy scanning is associated with cellular damage,” said Patricia Nguyen, […]

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Brain imaging may help predict future behavior

Noninvasive brain scans, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, have led to basic science discoveries about the human brain, but they’ve had only limited impacts on people’s day-to-day lives. A review article published in the January 7 issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron, however, highlights a number of recent studies showing that brain imaging […]

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New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer’s disease early

No methods currently exist for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, which affects one out of nine people over the age of 65. Now, an interdisciplinary team of Northwestern University scientists and engineers has developed a noninvasive MRI approach that can detect the disease in a living animal. And it can do so at the […]

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MRI-guided biopsy for brain cancer improves diagnosis

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“There are many different types of brain cancer. Making an accurate diagnosis is paramount because the diagnosis dictates the subsequent course of treatment,” said Clark C. Chen, MD, PhD, vice-chairman of research, division of neurosurgery, UC San Diego School of Medicine. “For instance, the treatment of glioblastoma is fundamentally different than the treatment for oligodendroglioma, […]

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MRI reveals genetic activity: Deciphering genes’ roles in learning and memory

Doctors commonly use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose tumors, damage from stroke, and many other medical conditions. Neuroscientists also rely on it as a research tool for identifying parts of the brain that carry out different cognitive functions. Now, a team of biological engineers at MIT is trying to adapt MRI to a much […]

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Preoperative PET cuts unnecessary lung surgeries in half

New quantitative data suggests that 30 percent of the surgeries performed for non-small cell lung cancer patients in a community-wide clinical study were deemed unnecessary. Additionally, positron emission tomography (PET) was found to reduce unnecessary surgeries by 50 percent, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. PET imaging […]

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MRI to ‘see through’ metal screws developed to follow patients after hip fracture surgery

People who sustain the most common type of hip fracture, known as a femoral neck fracture, are at increased risk of complications. A special type of MRI developed at Hospital for Special Surgery in collaboration with GE Healthcare can show a detailed image following fracture repair, without the distortion caused by metal surgical screws that […]

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New imaging technique can diagnose common heart condition

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A new imaging technique for measuring blood flow in the heart and vessels can diagnose a common congenital heart abnormality, bicuspid aortic valve, and may lead to better prediction of complications. A Northwestern Medicine team reported the finding in the journal Circulation. In the study, the authors demonstrated for the first time a previously unknown […]

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Guatemala’s jaguars: Capturing phantoms in photos

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The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has released a photograph of a male jaguar taken by a remote camera trap in Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve. Activated by motion or heat differentials, camera traps “capture” pictures of secretive and elusive animals in the wild. Because each jaguar’s pattern of spots is unique, the photographs can be used […]

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Seeing the brain’s circuits with a new clarity

For scientists working to uncover the mysteries of the brain, fat is a problem. The fats inside cells bend and scatter light, obscuring researchers’ views when they try to peer deep into tissue. A new technique developed by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists solves that problem by removing the fat from the brain and […]

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World’s fastest camera used to detect rogue cancer cells

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The ability to distinguish and isolate rare cells from among a large population of assorted cells has become increasingly important for the early detection of disease and for monitoring disease treatments. Circulating cancer tumor cells are a perfect example. Typically, there are only a handful of them among a billion healthy cells, yet they are […]

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The elephant in the womb

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Before giving birth to a 110-kilogram calf, mothers carry the fetus for 22 months, the longest gestation period of any mammal. And whereas most mammals have only one corpus luteum—a temporary gland that controls hormone levels during pregnancy—elephants have as many as 11. Now, by giving 17 elephants blood tests and ultrasound scans throughout their […]

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Groundbreaking new graphene-based MRI contrast agent

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Dr. Balaji Sitharaman, PhD, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University, and a team of researchers developed a new, highly efficacious, potentially safer and more cost effective nanoparticle-based MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agent for improved disease diagnosis and detection. The most recent findings are discussed in detail in […]

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New sensory organ found in rorqual whales

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Scientists at the University of British Columbia and the Smithsonian Institution have discovered a sensory organ in rorqual whales that coordinates its signature lunge-feeding behaviour — and may help explain their enormous size. Rorquals are a subgroup of baleen whales — including blue, fin, minke and humpback whales. They are characterized by a special, accordion-like […]

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What is your dog thinking? Brain scans unleash canine secrets

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When your dog gazes up at you adoringly, what does it see? A best friend? A pack leader? A can opener? Many dog lovers make all kinds of inferences about how their pets feel about them, but no one has captured images of actual canine thought processes — until now. Emory University researchers have developed […]

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Sharp images from the living mouse brain

To explore the most intricate structures of the brain in order to decipher how it functions — Stefan Hell’s team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen has made a significant step closer to this goal. Using the STED microscopy developed by Hell, the scientists have, for the first time, […]

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Engineered bacteria effectively target tumors, enabling tumor imaging potential in mice

Tumor-targeted bioluminescent bacteria have been shown for the first time to provide accurate 3-D images of tumors in mice, further advancing the potential for targeted cancer drug delivery, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the online journal PLoS ONE. The specially engineered probiotic bacteria, like those found in many yogurts, […]

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Form and function: New MRI technique to diagnose or rule out Alzheimer’s disease

On the quest for safe, reliable and accessible tools to accurately diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found a new way of diagnosing and tracking Alzheimer’s disease, using an innovative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique called arterial spin labeling (ASL) to measure changes in brain function. […]

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Newly developed fluorescent protein makes internal organs visible

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed the first fluorescent protein that enables scientists to clearly “see” the internal organs of living animals without the need for a scalpel or imaging techniques that can have side effects or increase radiation exposure. The new probe could prove to be a breakthrough […]

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Imaging animals for better research

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CT scans are one technique that can help reduce the number of animals used in research. Scientists are increasingly turning to non-invasive imaging to further the ‘3Rs’ of work in animals — replacement, refinement and reduction. Although the use of animals in modern medicine and biology is essential, researchers are actively working to reduce the […]

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New MRI methodology revolutionizes imaging of the beating heart

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Scientists of the Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch have developed a highly efficient approach for imaging the beating human heart. The images produced in one of the world’s most powerful MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems whose power is equivalent to 150,000 times Earth’s magnetic field are of a […]

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