Tag Archives: Diagnostic Imaging (Radiography)

Imaging procedure can identify biomarker associated with Alzheimer’s disease

Preliminary research suggests that use of a type of molecular imaging procedure may have the ability to detect the presence of beta-amyloid in the brains of individuals during life, a biomarker that is identified during autopsy to confirm a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, according to a study in the January 19 issue of JAMA. “Both […]

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Major advance in MRI allows much faster brain scans

An international team of physicists and neuroscientists has reported a breakthrough in magnetic resonance imaging that allows brain scans more than seven times faster than currently possible. In a paper that appeared Dec. 20 in the journal PLoS ONE, a University of California, Berkeley, physicist and colleagues from the University of Minnesota and Oxford University […]

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New imaging advance illuminates immune response in breathing lung

Fast-moving objects create blurry images in photography, and the same challenge exists when scientists observe cellular interactions within tissues constantly in motion, such as the breathing lung. In a recent UCSF-led study in mice, researchers developed a method to stabilize living lung tissue for imaging without disrupting the normal function of the organ. The method […]

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Hip dysplasia susceptibility in dogs may be underreported

A study comparing a University of Pennsylvania method for evaluating a dog’s susceptibility to hip dysplasia to the traditional American method has shown that 80 percent of dogs judged to be normal by the traditional method are actually at risk for developing osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia, according to the Penn method. The results indicate that […]

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Molecular imaging detects first signs of Alzheimer’s disease

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Research revealed at the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s 57th Annual Meeting is furthering efforts to use molecular imaging as a means of early detection of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers are striving to detect the disease as early as possible by imaging the formation of a naturally-occurring protein in the brain called beta-amyloid, which is thought to […]

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Cyclotrons could alleviate medical isotope shortage

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The most widely used medical radioisotope, Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), is essential for an estimated 70,000 medical imaging procedures that take place daily around the world. Aging reactors, production intermittencies and threats of permanent reactor closures have researchers striving to develop alternative methods of supply. In a comparative study presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s 57th […]

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Next generation CT scanner views whole organs in a heartbeat

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UT Southwestern Medical Center is the first site in North Texas to launch the next generation in CT scanners, which allow doctors to image an entire organ in less than a second or track blood flow through the brain or to a tumor — all with less radiation exposure to patients. Aquilion One dynamic volume […]

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Scans show learning ‘sculpts’ the brain’s connections

Spontaneous brain activity formerly thought to be “white noise” measurably changes after a person learns a new task, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Chieti, Italy, have shown. Scientists also report that the degree of change reflects how well subjects have learned to perform the task. Their […]

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New brain scan better detects earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease in healthy people

A new type of brain scan, called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), appears to be better at detecting whether a person with memory loss might have brain changes of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in the January 6, 2010, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. As […]

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Placebo effect caught in the act in spinal nerves

The placebo effect is not only real; its ability to deaden pain has been pinpointed to cells in the spinal cord. That raises hopes for new ways of treating conditions such as chronic pain. The researchers who made the discovery scanned the spinal cords of volunteers while applying painful heat to one arm. Then they […]

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Hyper-SAGE boosts remote MRI sensitivity

A new technique in Magnetic Resonance Imaging dubbed “Hyper-SAGE” has the potential to detect ultra low concentrations of clinical targets, such as lung and other cancers. Development of Hyper-SAGE was led by one of the world’s foremost authorities on MRI technology, Alexander Pines, a chemist who holds joint appointments with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory […]

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Non-invasive brain surgery: Successful neurosurgery with transcranial MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound

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The Magnetic Resonance Center of the University Children’s Hospital Zurich has achieved a world first break through in MR-guided, non-invasive neurosurgery. Ten patients have been successfully treated by means of transcranial high-intensity focused ultrasound. This fully non-invasive procedure opens new horizons for neurosurgery and the treatment of different neurological brain disorders. In the context of […]

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PET scans may improve accuracy of dementia diagnosis

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A new study shows that the use of positron emission tomography (PET) scans may improve the accuracy of dementia diagnoses early in disease onset for more than one out of four patients. The results were presented at SNM’s 56th Annual Meeting. Early, accurate diagnosis of dementia is critical for providing the best available courses of […]

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Coronary angiography may improve outcomes for cardiac arrest patients

People who suffer cardiac arrests and then receive coronary angiography are twice as likely to survive without significant brain damage compared with those who don’t have the procedure, according to a study by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers. The study showed that patient outcomes improved with coronary angiography, an imaging procedure that shows […]

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Gorilla gets MRI at Bronx Zoo

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A brain scan was performed on a gorilla at the Bronx Zoo. The on-site procedure—performed by dozens of wildlife veterinarians, zookeepers, and medical personnel from several institutions—was made possible by the Bobby Murcer Mobile MRI Unit, a 48-foot-long MRI facility on wheels that conducted a comprehensive neurological scan on the brain of Fubo, a 42-year-old […]

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Decoding short-term memory with fMRI

People voluntarily pick what information they store in short-term memory. Now, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers can see just what information people are holding in memory based only on patterns of activity in the brain. Psychologists from the University of Oregon (UO) and the University of California (UC), San Diego, reported their findings […]

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People without symptoms of heart disease should exercise caution in obtaining cardiac imaging exams

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At the radiation dose levels used in cardiac imaging exams, such as cardiac CT or nuclear medicine scans, the risk of potentially harmful effects from ionizing radiation are low. However, since the exact level of risk is not known, people without symptoms of heart disease should think twice about seeking, or agreeing to, these types […]

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Brain’s blood surge doesn’t match activity

Functional MRI scans measure blood flow in the brain. Neuroscientists interpret this as a sign that neurons are firing, usually as someone performs a task or experiences an emotion. This enables them to link the emotion to the brain region where there was blood flow. Now, Aniruddha Das from Columbia University in New York and […]

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Brain’s arteries have a mind of their own

When studying the neurological basis for everything from how we deal with the loss of a loved one to why we crave certain foods, scientists have increasingly turned to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As it’s most often used, the technique measures blood oxygenation in the brain–and the assumption has always been that areas with […]

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Bleeding hearts revealed with new scan

Images that for the first time show bleeding inside the heart after people have suffered a heart attack have been captured by scientists, in a new study published today in the journal Radiology. The research shows that the amount of bleeding can indicate how damaged a person’s heart is after a heart attack. The researchers, […]

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Brain imaging studies under fire

A study attacking some of the most prominent research in the burgeoning field of social neuroscience is flawed and unfair, according to top scientists who have been accused of overselling their results. Brain imaging is used to assess neural mechanisms in social behaviour. Social neuroscience is the study of the neuro­biological mechanisms underlying social behaviour. […]

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New research lights up chronic bacterial infection inside bone

A new report demonstrates how a sensitive imaging technique gives scientists the upper hand in seeking out bacteria in chronic infections. Listeria monocytogenes is a type of pathogenic bacteria that can cause severe illness and death. Listeria outbreaks recently claimed twenty lives in Canada. Additionally, Listeria infection is the third most common cause of bacterial […]

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Scientists see brain aging before symptoms appear

UCLA scientists have used innovative brain-scan technology developed at UCLA, along with patient-specific information on Alzheimer’s disease risk, to help diagnose brain aging, often before symptoms appear. Published in the January issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, their study may offer a more accurate method for tracking brain aging. Researchers used positron emission tomography (PET), […]

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Study supports value of advanced CT scans to check for clogged arteries

In a development that researchers say is likely to quell concerns about the value of costly computed tomography (CT) scans to diagnose coronary artery blockages, an international team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins reports solid evidence that the newer, more powerful 64-CT scans can easily and correctly identify people with major blood vessel disease […]

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The relationship between inflammation and new bone formation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

Spinal inflammation as detected by magnetic resonance imaging and new bone formation as identified by conventional radiographs are characteristic for ankylosing spondylitis. Whether and how spondylitis and syndesmophyte formation are linked is unclear. Our objective was to investigate whether and how spinal inflammation is associated with new bone formation in ankylosing spondylitis. Spinal magnetic resonance […]

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Automated MRI technique assists in earlier Alzheimer’s diagnosis

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An automated system for measuring brain tissue with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can help physicians more accurately diagnose Alzheimer’s disease at an earlier stage according to a new study published in the July issue of the journal Radiology. In Alzheimer’s disease, nerve cell death and tissue loss cause all areas of the brain, especially the […]

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PET scanning probe allowing monitoring of the immune system

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Researchers at University of California – Los Angeles, UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have modified a common chemotherapy drug to create a new probe for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), an advance that will allow them to model and measure the immune system in action and monitor response to new therapies. The discovery, published June 8, […]

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Noninvasive assessment of coronary vasodilation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease

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Impaired coronary vasodilation to both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent stimuli have been associated with atherosclerosis. Direct measurement of coronary vasodilation using x-ray angiography or intravascular ultrasound is invasive and, thus, not appropriate for asymptomatic patients or for serial follow-up. In this study, high-resolution coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to investigate the vasodilatory response to […]

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Targeting a pathological area using MRI

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Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a common tool in clinical diagnosis due to the use of contrast agents, which are like colorants, enabling the contrast between healthy tissue and diseased tissue to be increased. However, the agents currently used clinically do not allow the identification of particular pathologies or of the affected area of […]

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Transmitting medical images via cell phones

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A process to transmit medical images via cellular phones that has been developed by a Hebrew University of Jerusalem researcher has the potential to provide sophisticated radiological diagnoses and treatment to the majority of the world’s population lacking access to such technology. This would include millions in developing nations as well as those in rural […]

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