Tag Archives: Dogs

Competition from cats drove extinction of many species of ancient dogs

Competition played a more important role in the evolution of the dog family (wolves, foxes, and their relatives) than climate change, shows a new international study published in PNAS. An international team including scientists from the Universities of Gothenburg (Sweden), São Paulo (Brazil) and Lausanne (Switzerland) analyzed over 2000 fossils and revealed that the arrival […]

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Prevention methods for dog bites too simplistic, researchers find

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that educating pet owners about canine body language may not be the answer to preventing dog bites as originally thought. Experts have argued that dog bites are preventable if owners are properly educated on how to read canine behaviour and identify high risk situations. Until now, however, […]

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One in four UK show dogs competing at Crufts is overweight

One in four dogs competing in the world’s largest canine show (Crufts) is overweight, despite the perception that entrants are supposed to represent ideal specimens of their breed, reveals research published online in Veterinary Record. The widespread dissemination of show dog images online may be ‘normalising’ obesity in dogs, now recognised to be a common […]

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Our bond with dogs may go back more than 27,000 years

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Dogs’ special relationship to humans may go back 27,000 to 40,000 years, according to genomic analysis of an ancient Taimyr wolf bone. Earlier genome-based estimates have suggested that the ancestors of modern-day dogs diverged from wolves no more than 16,000 years ago, after the last Ice Age. Dogs’ special relationship to humans may go back […]

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* Novel neurodegenerative disease and gene identified with the help of ‘man’s best friend’

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A breakthrough study performed with veterinary neurologists and neuropathologists has identified a gene mutation that causes a novel type of neurodegenerative disease in dogs. The results of the study shed light into the function of neurons, provide a new gene for human neurodegeneration, and may aid in developing better treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. A breakthrough […]

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Stopping HIV in its tracks: New subdermal implant delivers potent antiretroviral drugs

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Oak Crest Institute of Science Summary: A novel, subdermal implant delivering potent antiretroviral drugs shows extreme promise in stopping the spread of HIV, researchers report. Scientists say that they have developed a matchstick size implant, similar to a contraceptive implant, that successfully delivers a controlled, sustained release of ARV drugs up to 40 days in […]

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Dogs know that smile on your face

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Dogs can tell the difference between happy and angry human faces, according to a new study in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on February 12. The discovery represents the first solid evidence that an animal other than humans can discriminate between emotional expressions in another species, the researchers say. “We think the dogs in […]

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* Can humans get norovirus from their dogs?

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The research showed that some dogs can mount an immune response to human norovirus, said Caddy, who will be a junior research fellow at the University of Cambridge, beginning in August. “This strongly suggests that these dogs have been infected with the virus. We also confirmed that that human norovirus can bind to the cells […]

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* Dog DNA tests alone not enough for healthy pedigree, experts say

Breeding dogs on the basis of a single genetic test carries risks and may not improve the health of pedigree lines, experts warn. Only a combined approach that makes use of DNA analysis, health screening schemes and pedigree information will significantly reduce the frequency of inherited diseases. This approach will also improve genetic diversity, which […]

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Scent-trained dog detects thyroid cancer in human urine samples

“Current diagnostic procedures for thyroid cancer often yield uncertain results, leading to recurrent medical procedures and a large number of thyroid surgeries performed unnecessarily,” said the study’s senior investigator, Donald Bodenner, MD, PhD, chief of endocrine oncology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) in Little Rock. “Scent-trained canines could be used by […]

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* Rabies booster defends pets with out-of-date vaccination against the disease

A new study by Kansas State University veterinary diagnosticians finds that pets with out-of-date rabies vaccinations are very unlikely to develop the fatal disease if given a rabies booster immediately after exposure to the virus. The finding gives pet owners, veterinarians and public health officials new options when faced with the difficult situation of quarantining […]

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* Dog disease in lions spread by multiple species

Canine distemper, a viral disease that’s been infecting the famed lions of Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park, appears to be spread by multiple animal species, according to a study published by a transcontinental team of scientists. Writing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they say domestic dogs are no longer the primary […]

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Guts of obese dogs look similar to those of obese people

Obese people have a less diverse array of bacteria living in their guts than do thin people—and the same holds true for dogs. In a new study, researchers fed seven beagles unrestricted amounts of food for 6 months, during which each dog gained an average of 4.93 kilograms—about 67% of their initial average weight of […]

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Fear and caring are what’s at the core of divisive wolf debate

To hunt or not hunt wolves can’t be quantified as simply as men vs. women, hunters vs. anti-hunters, Democrats vs. Republicans or city vs. rural. What’s truly fueling the divisive debate is fear of wolves or the urge to care for canis lupis. The social dynamics at play and potential options for establishing common ground […]

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* Dogs hear our words and how we say them

When people hear another person talking to them, they respond not only to what is being said–those consonants and vowels strung together into words and sentences–but also to other features of that speech–the emotional tone and the speaker’s gender, for instance. Now, a report in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on November 26 provides […]

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* New natural supplement relieves canine arthritis

Arthritis pain in dogs can be relieved, with no side effects, by a new product based on medicinal plants and dietary supplements that was developed at the University of Montreal’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. “While acupuncture and electrical stimulation are two approaches that have been shown to have positive effects on dogs, until now a […]

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* Pet dogs set to test anti-ageing drug

Yeast, worms and mice: all have lived longer when treated with various chemical compounds in laboratory tests. But many promising leads have failed when tried in humans. This week, researchers are proposing a different approach to animal testing of life-extending drugs: trials in pet dogs. Their target is rapamycin, which is used clinically as part […]

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* Researchers treat canine cancer, likely to advance human health

A research team at MississippiState’s College of Veterinary   Medicine is working to better understand cancer in dogs, and the work also could advance knowledge of human cancer. Their investigation began with only a tiny blood platelet, but quickly they discovered opportunities for growth and expanding the breadth of the research. “We have a lot […]

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* Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate — conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy — and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 […]

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* Dog’s epigenome gives clues to human cancer

The bond between humans and dogs is strong and ancient. From being the protector of the first herds in a faithful pet, dogs and people share many aspects of life. The relationship between the two species has been studied by psychologists, anthropologists, ethnologists and also by genetic and molecular biologists. In this sense, dogs are […]

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* Agonizing rabies deaths can be stopped worldwide

The deadly rabies virus–aptly shaped like a bullet– can be eliminated among humans by stopping it point-blank among dogs, according to a team of international researchers led by the PaulG.AllenSchool for Global Animal Health at WashingtonStateUniversity. Ridding the world of rabies is cost-effective and achievable through mass dog vaccination programs, the scientists report in a […]

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Dogs can be pessimists, too

Dogs generally seem to be cheerful, happy-go-lucky characters, so you might expect that most would have an optimistic outlook on life. In fact some dogs are distinctly more pessimistic than others, research from the University of Sydney shows. “This research is exciting because it measures positive and negative emotional states in dogs objectively and non-invasively. […]

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* New cancer drug for dogs benefits human research, drug development

The drug, Verdinexor (KPT-335), works by preventing powerful tumor suppressing proteins from leaving the nucleus of cells, an exodus which allows cancer to grow unchecked. It’s the first new therapeutic option for dog lymphoma in more than two decades, potentially offering vets another alternative for treating the disease, which is the most common form of […]

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In India’s human dominated landscapes, top prey for leopards is dogs

A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society reveals that in India’s human dominated agricultural landscapes, where leopards prowl at night, it’s not livestock that’s primarily on the menu — it is man’s best friend. The study, which looked at scat samples for leopards in India’s Ahmednagar’s district in Maharashtra, found that 87 percent […]

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* Electronic training collars present welfare risk to pet dogs

The research, conducted by animal behaviour specialists at the University of Lincoln, UK, indicates that, in the sample of dogs studied, there are greater welfare concerns around the use of so-called “shock collars” than with positive reward-based training. The results have been published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal PLOS One. There are arguments for and […]

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* Pig pheromone proves useful in curtailing bad behavior in dogs

A professor at Texas Tech discovers Androstenone can stop dogs from barking, jumping. In a sense, John McGlone was just like any other pet owner a few years ago. He simply wanted to keep his Cairn Terrier from barking incessantly. Then again, McGlone is not like most dog owners in that he is a professor […]

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Sheepdogs use simple rules to herd sheep

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment. For the first time scientists used GPS technology to understand how sheepdogs do […]

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* Malaria control: The great mosquito hunt

From dogs to balloons, researchers are using unorthodox ways to find out where malaria vectors hide during a long dry season. The armed guards at Mali’s BamakoSenouInternationalAirport had never seen a German shepherd before. The only dogs they were familiar with were the small, scrappy mixed breeds that are common in West Africa. So when […]

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* Domestication syndrome: White patches, baby faces and tameness explained by mild neural crest deficits

More than 140 years ago, Charles Darwin noticed something peculiar about domesticated mammals. Compared to their wild ancestors, domestic species are more tame, and they also tend to display a suite of other characteristic features, including floppier ears, patches of white fur, and more juvenile faces with smaller jaws. Since Darwin’s observations, the explanation for […]

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Some dogs could see a kennel stay as exciting

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New research suggests that dogs who spend a short time in boarding kennels may not find it unduly stressful and could in fact find the change of scenery exciting. This hypothesis directly contradicts previous research which suggests that dogs experience acute stress following admission to kennels, and chronic stress in response to prolonged kennelling. The […]

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