Tag Archives: Endocrinology

* Type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease reversed in rats

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A controlled-release oral therapy has been developed by scientists that reversed type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats, according to a study. “Given these promising results in animal models of NAFLD/NASH and type 2 diabetes we are pursuing additional preclinical safety studies to take this mitochondrial protonophore approach to the clinic,” said the […]

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* Newly discovered hormone mimics the effects of exercise

Hormones are molecules that act as the body’s signals, triggering various physiological responses. The newly discovered hormone, dubbed “MOTS-c,” primarily targets muscle tissue, where it restores insulin sensitivity, counteracting diet-induced and age-dependent insulin resistance. “This represents a major advance in the identification of new treatments for age-related diseases such as diabetes,” said Pinchas Cohen, dean […]

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New method to assess hormone metabolite concentrations in wildlife research

Measuring hormone metabolites in urine and feces are essential for studies in wildlife conservation. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) developed a new method with which they can match metabolite concentrations obtained from different measurements during long-term studies or from analyses carried out in different laboratories. The study has […]

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* Researchers prevent type I diabetes in mouse model

In new research published in Endocrinology, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacological and physiological science at Saint Louis University, reports that his team has found a way to prevent type I diabetes in an animal model. Type I diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease that occurs when the body’s immune system destroys insulin producing pancreatic […]

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Is it possible to reset our biological clocks?

Physiological changes over the course of a day are regulated by a circadian system comprised of a central clock located deep within the centre of the brain and multiple clocks located in different parts of the body. This study, which was published in The FASEB Journal (published by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental […]

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Adult-onset diabetes, obesity cured in lab mice, scientists report

In preclinical trials, the new peptide — a molecular integration of three gastrointestinal hormones — lowered blood sugar levels and reduced body fat beyond all existing drugs, according to the work co-led by IU Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Richard DiMarchi and Matthias Tschöp, director of the Institute for Diabetes and Obesity at the German Research […]

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Testosterone promotes prostate cancer in rats

A researcher who found that testosterone raised the risk of prostate tumors and exacerbated the effects of carcinogenic chemical exposure in rats is urging caution in prescribing testosterone therapy to men who have not been diagnosed with hypogonadism, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s journal Endocrinology. Testosterone use has soared in […]

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* Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Fatigue, weight gain, chills, hair loss, anxiety, excessive perspiration — these symptoms are a few of the signs that the thyroid gland, which regulates the body’s heart rate and plays a crucial role in its metabolism, has gone haywire. Now, new research from Tel Aviv University points to an additional complication caused by thyroid imbalance: […]

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Some dogs could see a kennel stay as exciting

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New research suggests that dogs who spend a short time in boarding kennels may not find it unduly stressful and could in fact find the change of scenery exciting. This hypothesis directly contradicts previous research which suggests that dogs experience acute stress following admission to kennels, and chronic stress in response to prolonged kennelling. The […]

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* Stress hormone linked to short-term memory loss as we age, animal study suggests

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A new study at the University of Iowa reports a potential link between stress hormones and short-term memory loss in older adults. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, reveals that having high levels of cortisol — a natural hormone in our body whose levels surge when we are stressed — can lead to […]

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‘Love hormone’ has same effect on humans and dogs

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If we humans inhale oxytocin, the so-called “love hormone,” we become more trusting, cooperative, and generous. Scientists have shown that it’s the key chemical in the formation of bonds between many mammalian species and their offspring. But does oxytocin play the same role in social relationships that aren’t about reproduction? To find out, scientists in […]

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* ‘Trust hormone’ oxytocin helps old muscle work like new, study finds

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Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that oxytocin — a hormone associated with maternal nurturing, social attachments, childbirth and sex — is indispensable for healthy muscle maintenance and repair, and that in mice, it declines with age. The new study published in the journal Nature Communications, presents oxytocin as the latest treatment […]

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Hormone that controls supply of iron in red blood cell production discovered by researchers

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A UCLA research team has discovered a new hormone called erythroferrone, which regulates the iron supply needed for red blood-cell production. Iron is an essential functional component of hemoglobin, the molecule that transports oxygen throughout the body. Using a mouse model, researchers found that erythroferrone is made by red blood-cell progenitors in the bone marrow […]

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Leptin also influences brain cells that control appetite, researchers find

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Twenty years after the hormone leptin was found to regulate metabolism, appetite, and weight through brain cells called neurons, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that the hormone also acts on other types of cells to control appetite. Published in the June 1 issue of Nature Neuroscience, the findings could lead to development of […]

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Blocking insulin breakdown shows promise against diabetes

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Mouse study shows molecule controls blood sugar by hitting elusive drug target. The compound, reported today in Nature, blocks a protein called insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) in mice. “If you inhibit the enzyme that breaks down insulin, insulin levels in your body should be higher and your blood glucose should be lower,” says David Liu, a […]

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Missing hormone in birds: Leptin found in mallard duck, peregrine falcon and zebra finch

How does the Arctic tern (a sea bird) fly more than 80,000 miles in its roundtrip North Pole-to-South Pole migration? How does the Emperor penguin incubate eggs for months during the Antarctic winter without eating? How does the Rufous hummingbird, which weighs less than a nickel, migrate from British Columbia to Mexico? These physiological gymnastics […]

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Estrogen: Not just produced by ovaries

A University of Wisconsin-Madison research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen — a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout the entire aging process. The new research shows that the hypothalamus can directly control reproductive function in rhesus monkeys and very […]

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Gut reaction: Effect of diet, estrogen on gut microbiota

Study results from Texas A&M University and University of North Carolina School of Medicine scientists on the effect of diet complexity and estrogen hormone receptors on intestinal microbiota has been published in the September issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology. To date, research has shown that promoting the growth of certain beneficial intestinal microorganisms can […]

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Veterinary researcher’s thyroid project sheds light on molecular processes related to cystic fibrosis

Research in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University is leading to a better understanding of the molecular interactions in the thyroid gland related to cystic fibrosis. A genetic disorder, cystic fibrosis affects the function of epithelia, the tissues formed of cells that secrete and absorb an array of substances important for health. […]

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Hormone disruptors rise from the dead

The vast amounts of steroids that are fed to cattle in some countries end up in farm run-off and may affect the environment even after they are broken down by sunlight. Hormone-disrupting chemicals may be far more prevalent in lakes and rivers than previously thought. Environmental scientists have discovered that although these compounds are often […]

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Dog hair can be used to diagnose hormonal problems in dogs

A surprisingly large number of dogs suffer from hyperadrenocorticism. The symptoms are caused by excessive amounts of hormones — glucocorticoids — in the body. Unfortunately, though, diagnosis of the disease is complicated by the fact that glucocorticoid levels naturally fluctuate and most methods for measuring the concentration of the hormones in the blood provide only […]

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Potential therapeutic target for Cushing’s disease

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Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a protein that drives the formation of pituitary tumors in Cushing’s disease, a development that may give clinicians a therapeutic target to treat this potentially life-threatening disorder. The protein, called TR4 (testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4), is one of the human body’s 48 nuclear receptors, […]

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Potential diabetes breakthrough: Hormone spurs beta cell production

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Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. The researchers believe that the hormone might also have a role in treating type 1, or juvenile, diabetes. The work was […]

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Thyroid hormones reduce damage and improve heart function after myocardial infarction in rats

Thyroid hormone treatment administered to rats at the time of a heart attack (myocardial infarction) led to significant reduction in the loss of heart muscle cells and improvement in heart function, according to a study published by a team of researchers led by A. Martin Gerdes and Yue-Feng Chen from New York Institute of Technology […]

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Functional ovarian tissue engineered in lab

A proof-of-concept study suggests the possibility of engineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a more natural option for hormone replacement therapy for women. In Biomaterials, a team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine report that in the laboratory setting, engineered ovaries showed sustained release of the sex hormones estrogen […]

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Hormone combination shows promise in the treatment of obesity and diabetes

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A new treatment combining two hormones can reduce appetite, according to new research presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate, UK. This early study from an internationally-renowned team at Imperial College London provides ‘first in human’ evidence that a combined therapy using the hormones glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) may […]

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Thyroid hormones reduce damage and improve heart function after myocardial infarction in rats

Thyroid hormone treatment administered to rats at the time of a heart attack (myocardial infarction) led to significant reduction in the loss of heart muscle cells and improvement in heart function, according to a study published by a team of researchers led by A. Martin Gerdes and Yue-Feng Chen from New York Institute of Technology […]

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Cortisone can increase risk of acute pancreatitis

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that cortisone — a hormone used in certain medicines — increases the risk of acute pancreatitis. The results are published in the scientific journal JAMA Internal Medicine. According to the researchers, they suggest that patients treated with cortisone in some forms should be informed of the […]

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Artificial pancreas: The way of the future for treating type 1 diabetes

IRCM researchers, led by endocrinologist Dr. Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret, were the first to conduct a trial comparing a dual-hormone artificial pancreas with conventional diabetes treatment using an insulin pump and showed improved glucose levels and lower risks of hypoglycemia. Their results, published January 28 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), can have a great impact […]

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Type 1 diabetes cured in dogs, study suggests

Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), led by Fàtima Bosch, have shown for the first time that it is possible to cure diabetes in large animals with a single session of gene therapy. As published this week in Diabetes, the principal journal for research on the disease, after a single gene therapy session, […]

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