Tag Archives: Internal Medicine (Cardiology)

* First public collection of bacteria from the intestine of mice

Mouse models are extensively used in pharmaceutical and medical research, and it is known that the communities of microbes in their intestine can have a significant impact on the research output. However, there is still insufficient information available about many bacteria inhabiting the intestine of mice. For the first time, a collection of cultured bacterial […]

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Red meat consumption linked with increased risk of developing kidney failure

A new study indicates that red meat intake may increase the risk of kidney failure in the general population, and substituting red meat with alternative sources of protein from time to time may significantly reduce this risk. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Increasing […]

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* Bright light accelerates ageing in mice

Eliane Lucassen works the night shift at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, beginning her day at 6 p.m. Yet her own research has shown that this schedule might cause her health problems. “It’s funny,” the medical resident says. “Here I am, spreading around that it’s actually unhealthy. But it needs to be done.” […]

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From a heart in a backpack to a heart transplant

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All transplant patients are exceptional, but Stan Larkin’s successful heart transplant comes after living more than a year without a human heart and relying on a heart device he carried in a backpack. The first patient in Michigan ever discharged with a SynCardia temporary total artificial heart in 2014, Larkin was back at the University […]

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* World’s first vaccine developed against Toxic Shock Syndrome

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Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a severe circulatory and organ failure caused by bacterial toxins, usually triggered by bacteria from the Staphylococcus group. Researchers from MedUni Vienna’s Department of Clinical Pharmacology, in collaboration with the company Biomedizinische Forschungsgesellschaft mbH in Vienna, have now developed the world’s first safe and effective vaccine against this disease and […]

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* Research suggests a way to identify animals at risk of blood clots

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Patients who are critically ill, be they dog, cat or human, have a tendency toward blood clotting disorders. When the formation of a clot takes too long, it puts them at risk of uncontrolled bleeding. But the other extreme is also dangerous; if blood clots too readily, it can lead to organ failure or even […]

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* Tiny coils improve quality of life for patients with severe emphysema

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The minimally invasive implantation of tiny coils into the lungs improves exercise ability, lung function and quality of life for patients with severe emphysema, according to a large international trial presented by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and presented […]

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* Chronic kidney disease in cats: Expert guidance on a quality of life issue

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Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common, complex and progressive disease that is estimated to affect more than a third of cats over 10 years of age. Affected cats often present with a variety of clinical signs and complications including inappetence, nausea, vomiting, anemia, hypertension and urinary tract infections — as such, the disease can […]

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Form of genetically elevated ‘good’ cholesterol may actually be bad

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Research has implications for better understanding the relationship between ‘good’ cholesterol function — in addition to level — and heart disease risk. The generally accepted medical maxim that elevated HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is “good” has been overturned by a multi-center, international study, led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of […]

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Common cell transformed to master heart cell

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By genetically reprogramming the most common type of cell in mammalian connective tissue, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have generated master heart cells — primitive progenitors that form the developing heart. Writing online Feb. 11 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, a team led by cardiologist Timothy J. Kamp reports transforming mouse fibroblasts, cells […]

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Link between a mitochondrial defect and heart disease

Diet rich in fatty acids can prevent heart disease and increase survival of the mice with this condition, study shows. A defect in a vital mitochondrial process in heart cells causes a type of dilated cardiomyopathy, a heart condition that in humans leads in most cases to heart disease and premature death. The study, published […]

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Blood sugar levels in response to foods are highly individual

Which is more likely to raise blood sugar levels: sushi or ice cream? According to a Weizmann Institute of Science study reported in the November 19 issue of the journal Cell, the answer varies from one person to another. The study, which continuously monitored blood sugar levels in 800 people for a week, revealed that […]

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Diabetes drug could be used to combat fatty liver disease, research shows

New research published in The Lancet has shown that a drug, currently used in the treatment of Type II diabetes, can be effective in clearing fatty liver disease from some patients. The researchers from the University of Birmingham believe that the findings present the possibility of new therapies for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, […]

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Faster digestion in kangaroos reduces methane emissions

Animals produce methane during the digestion process — some more than others. Currently, around 20 percent of the world’s methane emissions stem from ruminants. If this gas is released into the atmosphere, it aggravates the greenhouse effect and aids global warming. Previous studies revealed that ruminants, which include cows and sheep, release more methane into […]

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How glucose regulation enables malignant tumor growth

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. The researchers identified a critical molecule in that pathway that, if blocked, might cripple lipid production by cancer cells and slow tumor growth. This approach would be a new strategy for treating a lethal type of brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme, […]

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Long-term effects of wireless heart failure monitor just released

Long-term data collected on the use of an FDA-approved wireless heart failure monitor shows the treatment cut hospitalizations nearly in half and significantly reduced risk of death in patients. It’s the longest follow-up of hemodynamic monitoring reported, published online by The Lancet. Dr. William Abraham, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at The Ohio […]

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* Nanotechnology advances could pave way for implantable artificial kidney

A surgically implantable, artificial kidney could be a promising alternative to kidney transplantation or dialysis for people with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Currently, more than 20 million Americans have kidney diseases, and more than 600,000 patients are receiving treatment for ESRD. U.S. government statistics indicate kidney care costs the U.S. health care system $40 […]

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Artificial foam heart created

Cornell University researchers have developed a new lightweight and stretchable material with the consistency of memory foam that has potential for use in prosthetic body parts, artificial organs and soft robotics. The foam is unique because it can be formed and has connected pores that allow fluids to be pumped through it. The polymer foam […]

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* What powers the pumping heart?

Researchers at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research have uncovered a treasure trove of proteins, which hold answers about how our heart pumps — a phenomenon known as contractility. Led by University of Toronto Physiology Professor Anthony Gramolini and his collaborator, Professor Thomas Kislinger in the Department of Medical Biophysics, the team used high-throughput […]

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Cause of heart damage in sepsis patients identified

Researchers at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health (IGH) have discovered a common cause of heart damage in patients with sepsis. Sepsis is the most common cause of death in hospitalized critically ill people and affects up to 18 million people world-wide annually. The electrical and mechanical malfunctions of the heart […]

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Fundamental beliefs about atherosclerosis overturned

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Doctors’ efforts to battle the dangerous atherosclerotic plaques that build up in our arteries and cause heart attacks and strokes are built on several false beliefs about the fundamental composition and formation of the plaques, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. These new discoveries will force researchers to reassess their […]

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* Heart patients can stop blood thinners when undergoing elective surgery

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Patients with atrial fibrillation who stopped taking blood thinners before they had elective surgery had no higher risk of developing blood clots and less risk of major bleeding compared to patients who were given a “bridge” therapy, according to research led by Duke Medicine. The findings add much-needed clarity to inconsistent practice guidelines that annually […]

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Breakthrough points to cure for debilitating heart and lung disease

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A protein that targets the effects of a faulty gene could offer the first treatment targeting the major genetic cause of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH), according to new research. A protein that targets the effects of a faulty gene could offer the first treatment targeting the major genetic cause of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH), according […]

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* Gene in high-altitude cattle disease sheds light on human lung disease

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Vanderbilt University researchers have found a genetic mutation that causes pulmonary hypertension in cattle grazed at high altitude, and which leads to a life-threatening condition called brisket disease. Their findings, reported in Nature Communications, may shed light on human lung disease, in particular, the mechanism behind non-familial pulmonary hypertension in patients with conditions such as […]

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* Heart cells regenerated in mice

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When a heart attack strikes, heart muscle cells die and scar tissue forms, paving the way for heart failure. Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of death worldwide, in part because the cells in our most vital organ do not get renewed. As opposed to blood, hair or skin cells that can renew themselves throughout […]

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Leading doctors warn that sepsis deaths will not be curbed without radical rethink of research strategy

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Leading doctors warn that medical and public recognition of sepsis — thought to contribute to between a third and a half of all hospital deaths — must improve if the number of deaths from this common and potentially life-threatening condition are to fall. In a new Commission, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Professor Jonathan […]

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Smart phone diagnosis? Biosensing platform quickly and accurately diagnoses disease and monitors treatment remotely

Thin, lightweight and flexible materials developed by researchers at Florida Atlantic University, Stanford University and Harvard University, integrate cellulose paper and flexible polyester films as new diagnostic tools to detect bioagents in whole blood, serum and peritoneal fluid. In much the same way that glucometers and pregnancy tests have revolutionized in-home diagnostic testing, researchers from […]

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* Protein may improve liver regeneration: GF21 boosts regenerative ability in mice carrying human PPAR alpha protein

Researchers at UC Davis have illuminated an important distinction between mice and humans: how human livers heal. The difference centers on a protein called PPARα, which activates liver regeneration. Normally, mouse PPARα is far more active and efficient than the human form, allowing mice to quickly regenerate damaged livers. However, the research shows that protein […]

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Heart bypass surgery outperforms new generation stents

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Despite the advent of a new generation of stents, patients with multiple narrowed arteries in the heart who received coronary artery bypass grafting fared better than those whose arteries were opened with balloon angioplasty and stents in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 64th Annual Scientific Session. The findings echo past studies, […]

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* Backup system that helps sustain liver during crisis discovered

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“This is an important finding,” said Ed Schmidt, a professor in MSU’s Department of Microbiology and Immunology and co-author of a newly published study in Nature Communications. “It tells us about humans and all living things. It’s an alternative way to maintain the balance you need in your cells to be alive.” Schmidt and his […]

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