Tag Archives: Soft Tissue Surgery

Delay in surgery can cause irreparable meniscus tears in children with ACL injuries

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For children aged 14 and under, delaying reconstructive surgery for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries may raise their risk of further injury, according to a new study by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons. If surgery occurs later than 12 weeks after the injury, the injury may even be irreparable. “Treating ACL injuries in these children is controversial, […]

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Building bone from cartilage

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A person has a tumor removed from her femur. A soldier is struck by an improved explosive device and loses a portion of his tibia. A child undergoes chemotherapy for osteosarcoma but part of the bone dies as a result. Every year, millions of Americans sustain fractures that don’t heal or lose bone that isn’t […]

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Potential biomarker for osteoarthritis identified

Researchers have identified for the first time two molecules that hold promise as a biomarker for measuring cartilage damage associated with osteoarthritis. The concentration of two molecules called non-coding RNAs in blood were associated with mild cartilage damage in 30 patients who were one year removed from reconstruction surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament, […]

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Discovery uses ‘fracture putty’ to repair broken bone in days

Broken bones in humans and animals are painful and often take months to heal. Studies conducted in part by University of Georgia Regenerative Bioscience Center researchers show promise to significantly shorten the healing time and revolutionize the course of fracture treatment. “Complex fractures are a major cause of amputation of limbs for U.S. military men […]

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Headed for surgery? Hold the protein

A new study suggests that in mice, cutting protein from the diet for a week can protect organs that might otherwise be damaged by injury or surgery. That’s a common recommendation doctors give patients to ensure a safe procedure. Now a new study in mice suggests that the advice may have benefits beyond the operation […]

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Revolutionary surgical technique for treating perforations of the eardrum

A revolutionary surgical technique for treating perforations of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) in children and adults has been developed at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Centre, an affiliate of the Université de Montreal, by Dr. Issam Saliba. The new technique, which is as effective as traditional surgery and far less expensive, can be performed in 20 […]

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Gunshot, stabbing victims are recovering without exploratory surgery

Although more patients with abdominal gunshot and stab wounds can successfully forego emergency “exploratory” surgery and its potential complications, new Johns Hopkins research suggests that choosing the wrong patients for this “watchful waiting” approach substantially increases their risk of death from these injuries. “Managing gunshot and stab wounds without exploratory surgery prevents complications, saves money […]

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Less blood needed post-surgery, new study suggests

Patients need less blood after surgery than is widely thought. A new study comparing two plans for giving blood transfusions following surgery showed no ill effects from postponing transfusion until patients develop signs of anemia or their hemoglobin concentration falls below 8 g/dL. Results of the National Heart and Lung and Blood Institute- funded study […]

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New bandage spurs, guides blood vessel growth

Researchers have developed a bandage that stimulates and directs blood vessel growth on the surface of a wound. The bandage, called a “microvascular stamp,” contains living cells that deliver growth factors to damaged tissues in a defined pattern. After a week, the pattern of the stamp “is written in blood vessels,” the researchers report. A […]

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Earlier tracheostomies after head injuries result in better patient outcomes

A tracheostomy performed within the first seven days after a severe head injury results in better overall patient outcome, according to a team of Penn State College of Medicine researchers. This is especially true for patients who have a greater chance of surviving when admitted to the hospital. “The CDC estimates that more than 200,000 […]

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Glowing cells guide cancer surgeons

Most malignant ovarian tumours express high numbers of receptors for the molecule folate (also known as vitamin B9), so by attaching the fluorescent molecule fluorescein iso-thiocyanate to folate, researchers created a cancer-cell probe. After injecting this into patients, labelled cells were made to glow white with a special camera and light, allowing surgeons to spot […]

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Use adult stem cells to grow neck vertebrae

Neurosurgery researchers at UC Davis Health System have used a new, leading-edge stem cell therapy to promote the growth of bone tissue following the removal of cervical discs — the cushions between the bones in the neck — to relieve chronic, debilitating pain. The procedure was performed by associate professors of neurosurgery Kee Kim and […]

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Sutureless method for joining blood vessels invented

Reconnecting severed blood vessels is mostly done the same way today — with sutures — as it was 100 years ago, when the French surgeon Alexis Carrel won a Nobel Prize for advancing the technique. Now, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has developed a sutureless method that appears to […]

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Incisionless surgery now available as an investigational treatment for esophageal disorder

The procedure is one of a growing number of surgeries to use the body’s natural orifices as an entry point, thus eliminating the need for traditional incisions. Northwestern Memorial Hospital is one of only a few centers in the U.S. with surgeons trained to perform the procedure. “This surgical approach not only eliminates the need […]

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Surgeon shows simple cotton swab slashes post-surgical wound infections

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A simple item found in almost every medicine cabinet — a cotton swab — may be a key tool in the fight against post-surgical wound infections. In a sentinel trial, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center surgeon Shirin Towfigh, MD, showed that painless and gentle probing of a wound with a dry cotton swab after surgery dramatically reduced […]

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Artificial tissue promotes skin growth in wounds

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Victims of third-degree burns and other traumatic injuries endure pain, disfigurement, invasive surgeries and a long time waiting for skin to grow back. Improved tissue grafts designed by Cornell scientists that promote vascular growth could hasten healing, encourage healthy skin to invade the wounded area and reduce the need for surgery. These so-called dermal templates […]

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Hospitals misleading patients about benefits of robotic surgery, study suggests

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An estimated four in 10 hospital websites in the United States publicize the use of robotic surgery, with the lion’s share touting its clinical superiority despite a lack of scientific evidence that robotic surgery is any better than conventional operations, a new Johns Hopkins study finds. The promotional materials, researchers report online in the Journal […]

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Bone marrow cells that transform into skin cells could revolutionize approach to wound treatment

Researchers at King’s College London and Osaka University in Japan have identified specific bone marrow cells that can transform into skin cells to repair damaged skin tissue, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The team has uncovered how this process works, providing new insights into the mechanisms […]

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Novel surgery removes rare tumor, rebuilds trachea

Using a novel surgical approach, it’s possible to rebuild the trachea and preserve a patient’s voice after removing an invasive throat tumor, according to a new report from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. This case study is the first of its kind to not only document a successful technique to create a fully functional trachea, […]

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Robotic surgery of ‘tremendous benefit’ to patients

Robot-assisted surgery dramatically improves outcomes in patients with uterine, endometrial, and cervical cancer, said researchers at the Jewish General Hospital’s Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research in Montreal. Moreover, because of fewer post-operative complications and shorter hospital stays, robotic procedures also cost less. These results were published in late 2010 in a series of studies […]

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Five-year results show keyhole bowel cancer surgery as safe and effective

Laparoscopic or ‘keyhole’ surgery is a safe, effective way of removing bowel tumours and should be offered to all patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, according to researchers from the University of Leeds. Patients who have laparoscopic surgery spend less time in hospital and recover more quickly from the operation. Now long-term follow-up data has […]

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Origin of skillful stone-tool-sharpening method pushed back more than 50,000 years

A highly skillful and delicate method of sharpening and retouching stone artifacts by prehistoric people appears to have been developed at least 75,000 years ago, more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. A paper on the subject was published in the […]

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SpectroPen could help surgeons see the edges of tumors in human patients in real time during surgery

Biomedical engineers are developing a hand-held device called a SpectroPen that could help surgeons see the edges of tumors in human patients in real time during surgery. Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of Pennsylvania describe the device in an article published this week in the […]

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Surgeons expand the use of scar-free surgical technique to more patients

A team of surgeons from Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York who have pioneered scar-free gallbladder removal are offering the procedure to all suitable patients and extending this new type of surgical procedure to other operations in the abdomen. They reported on their updated findings October 6 at the 2010 Annual Clinical Congress of the […]

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Early success with laser that destroys tumors with heat

Physicians at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus are among the first in the nation to use a technique known as MRI-guided laser ablation to heat up and destroy kidney and liver tumors. So far, five patients have been successfully treated — meaning no visible tumors remained after the procedure. Although the treatment techniques are in the […]

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How to control massive bleeding from the hepatic artery

Delayed hepatic arterial hemorrhage after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is not a common but a fatal complication, occurring in 7% of all patients. Its ideal management remains unclear and controversial. A research article published on August 7, 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The authors reported the clinical outcome of 9 patients with […]

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Scarless brain surgery is new option for patients

Surgeons at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine and University of Washington Medical Center have determined that transorbital neuroendoscopic surgery (TONES) is a safe and effective option for treating a variety of advanced brain diseases and traumatic injuries. This groundbreaking minimally invasive surgery is performed through the eye socket, thus eliminating the […]

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Surgery: No sponge left behind

Using the same technology found in clothing tags used in retail store tracking systems, a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that surgical sponges with implanted radio frequency (RF) tags may be an effective adjunct to manual counting and X-ray detection in preventing sponges from being left behind in patients […]

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Sepsis and septic shock more common than heart attacks or pulmonary blood clots after general surgery

Sepsis and septic shock appear to be more common than heart attacks or pulmonary blood clots among patients having general surgery, and the death rate for patients with septic shock is approximately 34 percent within 30 days of operation, according to a report in the July issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives […]

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Surgery linked to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, according to Spanish study

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A new study spearheaded by Spanish scientists demonstrates a causal relationship between the onset of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), caused by a protein called a prion, and general surgery. CJD manifests itself in hereditary acquired and sporadic forms, or for unknown reasons, which accounts for the majority of cases. “Based on the monitoring records of spongiform […]

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