Tag Archives: Toxicology

Low levels of BPA exposure may be considered safe, but new research suggests otherwise

Posted on

In the report, researchers from Yale show that the genome is permanently altered in the uterus of mice that had been exposed to BPA during their fetal development. These changes were found to mainly affect genes that are regulated by estrogen and are implicated in the formation of estrogen-related diseases such as infertility, endometriosis, endometrial […]

Tags: ,

Wood toxin could harm zoo animals

Posted on

When those cute animals gnaw on wood enclosures at a zoo, they may be risking their health by ingesting toxic levels of arsenic, so zoo managers need to pay attention to the potential risk of the wood on zoo animals, a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows. The wood […]

Tags: ,

Botulism in waterbirds: Mortality rates and new insights into how it spreads

Outbreaks of botulism killed large percentages of waterbirds inhabiting a wetland in Spain. During one season, more than 80 percent of gadwalls and black-winged stilts died. The botulinum toxin’s spread may have been abetted by an invasive species of water snail which frequently carries the toxin-producing bacterium, Clostridium botulinum, and which is well adapted to […]

Tags: , ,

Testing detects algal toxins in Alaska marine mammals

Posted on

Toxins from harmful algae are present in Alaskan marine food webs in high enough concentrations to be detected in marine mammals such as whales, walruses, sea lions, seals, porpoises and sea otters, according to new research from NOAA and its federal, state, local and academic partners. The findings, reported online today in the journal Harmful […]

Tags: ,

Its complicated: Benefits and toxicity of antiprion antibodies in the brain

Immunotherapy to ameliorate neurodegeneration by targeting brain protein aggregates with antibodies is an area of intense investigation. A study published on January 28th in PLOS Pathogens examines seemingly contradictory earlier results of targeting the prion protein and proposes a cautionary way forward to further test related therapeutic approaches. Damaging aggregation of proteins in the brain […]

Tags: , ,

*First brain scans of sea lions give clues to strandings

Brain scans and behavioral tests of California sea lions that stranded on shore show how an algal toxin disrupts brain networks, leading to deficits in spatial memory, according to a study to be published Dec. 18 in Science. The new findings by scientists at the University of California Santa Cruz, UC Davis and the Marine […]

Tags: , ,

Data scientists create world’s first therapeutic venom database

What doesn’t kill you could cure you. A growing interest in the therapeutic value of animal venom has led a pair of Columbia University data scientists to create the first catalog of known animal toxins and their physiological effects on humans. VenomKB, short for Venom Knowledge Base, summarizes the results of 5,117 studies in the […]

Tags: , ,

Births down and deaths up in Gulf dolphins

A NOAA-led team of scientists is reporting a high rate of reproductive failure in dolphins exposed to oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill. The team has monitored these bottlenose dolphins in heavily-oiled Barataria Bay for five years following the spill. Their findings, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society today, suggest that the effects of […]

Tags: , ,

Chernobyl: At site of world’s worst nuclear disaster, the animals have returned

In 1986, after a fire and explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant released radioactive particles into the air, thousands of people left the area, never to return. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on October 5 have found that the Chernobyl site looks less like a disaster zone and more […]

Tags: ,

* Mice exposed to environmental chemicals may show decreased physical activity in offspring

Endocrine disruptors are contaminants that interfere with endocrine or hormone systems and can cause tumors, birth defects and developmental disorders in mammals. Often, these contaminants are used in a variety of consumer products, such as water bottles, dental composites and resins used to line metal food and beverage containers. Now, a University of Missouri study […]

Tags: ,

* Plastic in 99 percent of seabirds by 2050

Researchers from CSIRO and Imperial College London have assessed how widespread the threat of plastic is for the world’s seabirds, including albatrosses, shearwaters and penguins, and found the majority of seabird species have plastic in their gut. The study, led by Dr Chris Wilcox with co-authors Dr Denise Hardesty and Dr Erik van Sebille and […]

Tags: ,

* Novel fatigue syndrome in feedlot cattle discovered

Researchers at Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at Iowa State University and Texas Tech University, have discovered a novel fatigue syndrome affecting feedlot cattle. The syndrome is similar to one affecting the swine industry. The researchers’ landmark paper, “Description of a novel fatigue syndrome of finished feedlot cattle following […]

Tags: ,

Racehorses at risk from misuse of cobalt, new study finds

In a new study published in The Veterinary Journal, scientists from the University of Surrey warn about the numerous risks posed to racehorses from the misuse of cobalt chloride, a banned performance-enhancing agent that has been used illegally by trainers in Australia and USA. The team of researchers have uncovered that when excessive levels of […]

Tags: ,

Neurotoxin found in commercial seafood

Posted on

Popular commercial seafood purchased from Swedish supermarkets at the Stockholm region contains Beta-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA). BMAA is a naturally-occurring amino acid with a possible link to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. It is the first screening study to measure BMAA in commercial seafood from metropolitan markets. Popular commercial seafood […]

Tags: ,

* ‘Flameproof’ falcons and hawks: Most polluted bird on record found in Vancouver

Posted on

A Cooper’s hawk, found in Greater Vancouver, is the most polluted wild bird that has been found anywhere in the world. A team of Canadian researchers made this startling discovery while analyzing liver samples from birds of prey that were discovered either injured or dead in the Vancouver area. The levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers […]

Tags: ,

Mercury levels in Hawaiian yellowfin tuna increasing

Mercury concentrations in Hawaiian yellowfin tuna are increasing at a rate of 3.8 percent or more per year, according to a new University of Michigan-led study that suggests rising atmospheric levels of the toxin are to blame. Mercury is a potent toxin that can accumulate to high concentrations in fish, posing a health risk to […]

Tags: ,

Are all rattlesnakes created equal? No, maybe not

But new research by a team of biologists at Florida State University has revealed that creating antivenom is a bit tricky. That’s because the type of venom a snake produces can change according to where it lives. Mark Marges, a Florida State doctoral student in Professor Darin Rokyta’s laboratory, led a research study that examined […]

Tags: ,

Poisoning Tibet’s rabbit relatives may be a bad move

The plateau pika doesn’t have many friends. This small burrowing relative of the rabbit, weighing only around 140 grams, is the most abundant mammal on the vast grasslands of the Tibetan plateau, but it is widely condemned as a cause of soil erosion and an  ecosystem wrecker. There is a government-funded campaign to exterminate them […]

Tags: ,

Seabird losses from deepwater horizon oil spill estimated at hundreds of thousands

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill is often cited as the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history—yet its impacts on the marine life of the Gulf of Mexico have gone largely undetermined. Now, new findings published this month in Marine Ecology Progress Series estimate that the number of seabirds lost as a result of the […]

Tags: ,

* Poisoned vulture could herald European bird crisis

India’s vultures have suffered catastrophic declines since the 1990s, with populations of certain species such as Gyps indicus falling by more than 95%, and considered critically endangered. Scientists have blamed the drug diclofenac, which vets give to farm animals to treat conditions ranging from pneumonia to arthritis — but which can be deadly to vultures […]

Tags: ,

New poison dart frog species discovered in Donoso, Panama

A bright orange poison dart frog with a unique call was discovered in Donoso, Panama, and described by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí in Panama, and the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. In the species description published this week in Zootaxa, it was named Andinobates geminisae […]

Tags: ,

Exposure to toxins makes great granddaughters more susceptible to stress

Scientists have known that toxic effects of substances known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), found in both natural and human-made materials, can pass from one generation to the next, but new research shows that females with ancestral exposure to EDC may show especially adverse reactions to stress. According to a new study by researchers from […]

Tags: ,

Toxic toads threaten ‘ecological disaster’ for Madagascar

Posted on

The unique wildlife of Madagascar is facing an invasion of toxic toads that could devastate the island’s native species. Snakes feeding on the toads are especially at risk of poisoning, as are a host of other animals unique to the island — such as lemurs and endemic birds — and the species could cause harm […]

Tags: ,

* Mouse model would have predicted toxicity of drug that killed 5 in 1993 clinical trial

Posted on

Over 20 years after the fatal fialuridine trial, a study published this week in PLOS Medicine demonstrates that mice with humanized livers recapitulate the drug’s toxicity. The work suggests that this mouse model should be added to the repertoire of tools used in preclinical screening of drugs for liver toxicity before they are given to […]

Tags: ,

* This chip can tell if you’ve been poisoned

Posted on

When you are dealing with a deadly poison that can be found in food and is a potential terrorist weapon, you want the best detection tools you can get. Now, researchers in France have demonstrated an improved method to detect the most deadly variant of the botulinum neurotoxin, which causes botulism. Their test provides results […]

Tags: ,

Surprise finding, blood clots absorb bacterial toxin

Blood clots play an unexpected role in protecting the body from the deadly effects of bacteria by absorbing bacterial toxins, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found. The research was published Dec. 2 in the journal PLoS ONE. It’s a significant addition to the short list of defenses that animals use to protect […]

Tags: ,

Early-life exposure of frogs to herbicide increases mortality from fungal disease

The combination of the herbicide atrazine and a fungal disease is particularly deadly to frogs, shows new research from a University of South Florida laboratory, which has been investigating the global demise of amphibian populations. USF Biologist Jason Rohr said the new findings show that early-life exposure to atrazine increases frog mortality but only when […]

Tags: ,

Eating poisonous plants saves life of gemsbok in Namibian desert

In drought periods browsing springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) feed on all plant material they can find, while grazing gemsbok (Oryx gazella gazella), in contrast, switch their diet to a high proportion of poisonous plants — and they survive. These findings were just published in the scientific online journal PLOS ONE. “We wanted to understand how these […]

Tags: ,

Environmental toxins enter the brain tissue of polar bears

Scientists from Denmark and Canada are worried by their new findings showing that several bioaccumulative perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are crossing the blood brain barrier of polar bears from Scoresby Sound, East Greenland. PerFluoroAlkyl Substances (PFASs) and precursor compounds have been used in a wide variety of commercial and industrial products over the past six decades. […]

Tags: ,

Mercury pollution threatens arctic foxes

Posted on

New scientific results show that arctic foxes accumulate dangerous levels of mercury if they live in coastal habitats and feed on prey which lives in the ocean. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Moscow State University and the University of Iceland just published their discovery in the science online journal PLOS […]

Tags: ,

Sidebar