Tag Archives: Vaccinology

HPV vaccine can protect women across a broad age range

A research paper published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is safe and efficacious across a wide age range of women. The international study found that it protects against HPV infection in women older than 26 years. Vaccination programs worldwide currently target routine vaccination of women 26 years and […]

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HPV vaccine reduced cervical abnormalities in young women

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Young women who received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine through a school-based program had fewer cervical cell anomalies when screened for cervical cancer, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). “Eight years after a school-based HPV vaccination program was initiated in Alberta, 3-dose HPV vaccination has demonstrated early benefits, particularly against high-grade […]

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Anthrax capsule vaccine completely protects monkeys from lethal inhalational anthrax

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Vaccination with the anthrax capsule–a naturally occurring component of the bacterium that causes the disease–completely protected monkeys from lethal anthrax infection, according to a study published online this week in the journal VACCINE. These results indicate that anthrax capsule is a highly effective vaccine component that should be considered for incorporation in future generation anthrax […]

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* World’s first vaccine developed against Toxic Shock Syndrome

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Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a severe circulatory and organ failure caused by bacterial toxins, usually triggered by bacteria from the Staphylococcus group. Researchers from MedUni Vienna’s Department of Clinical Pharmacology, in collaboration with the company Biomedizinische Forschungsgesellschaft mbH in Vienna, have now developed the world’s first safe and effective vaccine against this disease and […]

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Putting the brakes on cell’s ‘engine’ could give flu, other vaccines a boost

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A relatively unknown molecule that regulates metabolism could be the key to boosting an individual’s immunity to the flu — and potentially other viruses — according to research reported today in the journal Immunity. The study, led by University of Vermont (UVM) College of Medicine doctoral student Devin Champagne and Mercedes Rincon, Ph.D., a professor […]

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Long-term survival achieved in metastatic melanoma with personalized vaccine

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Robert O. Dillman, MD, formerly Vice President Oncology, Caladrius Biosciences, Inc. and currently Chief Medical Officer, NeoStem Oncology (Irvine, CA) and Executive Medical and Scientific Director, Hoag Cancer Institute (Newport Beach, CA) discusses the typically poor prognosis for patients with melanoma of the eye or skin that spreads to the liver, and reports on the […]

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* First ever vaccine for deadly parasitic infection may help prevent another global outbreak

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As scientists scramble to get a Zika virus vaccine into human trials by the end of the summer, a team of researchers is working on the first-ever vaccine to prevent another insect-borne disease — Leishmaniasis — from gaining a similar foothold in the Americas. Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection passed on through the bite of […]

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Researchers push for personalized tumour vaccines

It is precision medicine taken to the extreme: cancer-fighting vaccines that are custom designed for each patient according to the mutations in their individual tumours. With early clinical trials showing promise, that extreme could one day become commonplace — but only if drug developers can scale up and speed up the production of their tailored […]

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New mouse model to aid testing of Zika vaccine, therapeutics

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A research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has established a mouse model for testing of vaccines and therapeutics to battle Zika virus. The mouse model mimics aspects of the infection in humans, with high levels of the virus seen in the mouse brain and spinal cord, consistent with evidence showing […]

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HIV vaccine candidate confirms promise in preclinical study

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Mymetics Corporation (OTCQB: MYMX), a pioneer in the research and development of virosome-based vaccines to prevent transmission of human infectious diseases across mucosal membranes, has announced that its innovative HIV vaccine candidate has shown to generate significant protection in groups of twelve female monkeys against repeated AIDS virus exposures during part of the preclinical study. […]

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First in-human vaccine study for malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax

Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) researchers recently published the results of testing a Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine candidate in a human challenge model. A vaccine to prevent infection and disease caused by P. vivax is critical to reduce sickness and mortality from vivax malaria, a common cause of malaria among deployed service members. […]

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Effectiveness of a herpesvirus CMV-based vaccine against Ebola

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This study represents a crucial step in the translation of herpesvirus-based Ebola virus vaccines into humans and other great apes. As the latest in a series of studies, researchers at Plymouth University, National Institutes of Health and University of California, Riverside, have shown the ability of a vaccine vector based on a common herpesvirus called […]

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Much of the devastation wrought by Ebola in West Africa might have been prevented with a vaccine

With the Ebola outbreak in West Africa stubbornly hanging on, officials have brokered an agreement to ensure that a vaccine is available to fight future occurrences. On 20 January, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, announced that it has paid US$5 million to Merck, the manufacturer of the first Ebola vaccine shown to protect against the virus […]

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Why the flu vaccine is less effective in the elderly

Around this time every year, the flu virus infects up to one-fifth of the U.S. population and kills thousands of people, many of them elderly. A study published by Cell Press on Dec. 15, 2015 in Immunity now explains why the flu vaccine is less effective at protecting older individuals. More broadly, the findings reveal […]

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* MERS virus: Drying out the reservoir

A German-Dutch team has succeeded in immunizing dromedaries against the MERS virus. As the camels appear to be the major reservoir of the virus, the vaccine should also reduce the risk of future outbreaks of the disease in humans. The recently discovered coronavirus now referred to as MERS (for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) causes an […]

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Towards a safe and efficient SARS-coronavirus vaccine: Mechanism and prevention of genetic instability of a live attenuated virus

Live attenuated (weakened) viral vaccines are considered safe so long as their “reversal” to a virulent (or disease-causing) virus is prevented. A study published on October 29th in PLOS Pathogens reports on how to rationally modify an effective live attenuated SARS vaccine to make it genetically stable. Luis Enjuanes, from the Centro Nacional de Biotecnología […]

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Immune responses provide clues for HIV vaccine development

Recent research has yielded new information about immune responses associated with–and potentially responsible for–protection from HIV infection, providing leads for new strategies to develop an HIV vaccine. Results from the RV144 trial, reported in 2009, provided the first signal of HIV vaccine efficacy: a 31 percent reduction in HIV infection among vaccinees. Since then, an […]

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New study has important implications for the design of a protective HIV vaccine

A PhD student from the University of the Witwatersrand has published a study in the journal, Nature Medicine, describing how the changing viral swarm in an HIV infected person can drive the generation of antibodies able to neutralize HIV strains from across the world. The study has important implications for the design of a protective […]

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Vaccination on the horizon for severe viral infection of the brain

Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich reveal possible new treatment methods for a rare, usually fatal brain disease. Thanks to their discovery that specific antibodies play a key role in combating the viral infection, a vaccine against the disease “progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy” could now be developed. Humans carry a multitude […]

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* ‘Immune camouflage’ may explain H7N9 influenza vaccine failure

The avian influenza A (H7N9) virus has been a major concern since the first outbreak in China in 2013. Due to its high rate of lethality and pandemic potential, H7N9 vaccine development has become a priority for public health officials. However, candidate vaccines have failed to elicit the strong immune responses necessary to protect from […]

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* Virus-like particle vaccine protects mice from many flu strains

Each year, scientists create an influenza (flu) vaccine that protects against a few specific influenza strains that researchers predict are going to be the most common during that year. Now, a new study shows that scientists may be able to create a ‘universal’ vaccine that can provide broad protection against numerous influenza strains, including those […]

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* Some vaccines support evolution of more-virulent viruses

Scientific experiments with the herpesvirus such as the one that causes Marek’s disease in poultry have confirmed, for the first time, the highly controversial theory that some vaccines could allow more-virulent versions of a virus to survive, putting unvaccinated individuals at greater risk of severe illness. The research has important implications for food-chain security and […]

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Vaccine to protect global communities from malaria under development

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A University of Oklahoma professor studying malaria mosquito interaction has discovered a new mosquito protein for the development of a new vaccine that is expected to stop the spread of the disease in areas where it is considered endemic. Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes, and it infects millions of people in Africa, Asia and South […]

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Vaccines developed for H5N1, H7N9 avian influenza strains

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Researchers have developed vaccines for H5N1 and H7N9, two new strains of avian influenza that can be transmitted from poultry to humans. The strains have led to the culling of millions of commercial chickens and turkeys as well as the death of hundreds of people. Wenjun Ma, assistant professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology at […]

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* Ebola whole virus vaccine shown effective, safe in primates

The vaccine, described today (March 26, 2015) in the journal Science, was developed by a group led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, a University of Wisconsin-Madison expert on avian influenza, Ebola and other viruses of medical importance. It differs from other Ebola vaccines because as an inactivated whole virus vaccine, it primes the host immune system with […]

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Tumour mutations harnessed to build cancer vaccine

Personalized vaccines could provide new options to treat cancers driven by multiple genetic mutations. Vaccines made from mutated proteins found in tumours have bolstered immune responses to cancer in a small clinical trial. The results, published on 2 April in Science, are the latest from mounting efforts to generate personalized cancer therapies. In this case, […]

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Low vaccination rates likely fuel the 2015 measles outbreak, calculations show

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Inadequate vaccine coverage is likely a driving force behind the ongoing Disneyland measles outbreak, according to calculations by a research team at Boston Children’s Hospital. Their report, based on epidemiological data and published online by JAMA Pediatrics, indicates that vaccine coverage among the exposed populations is far below that necessary to keep the virus in […]

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Opinions on vaccinations heavily influenced by online comments

With measles and other diseases once thought eradicated making a comeback in the United States, healthcare websites are on the spot to educate consumers about important health risks. Washington State University researchers say that people may be influenced more by online comments than by credible public service announcements (PSAs). Writing in the Journal of Advertising, […]

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Developing vaccines for insect-borne viruses

Vaccines developed using proteins rather than live viruses can help protect animals and subsequently humans from insect-borne viruses, according to Alan Young, chief scientific officer for Medgene Labs, an animal health company that develops therapeutics and diagnostics, including vaccines. “Platform technologies — that is where our niche is,” said Young, who is also a veterinary […]

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Beating the clock: researchers develop new treatment for rabies

Successfully treating rabies can be a race against the clock. Those who suffer a bite from a rabid animal have a brief window of time to seek medical help before the virus takes root in the central nervous system, at which point the disease is almost invariably fatal. Now, researchers at the University of Georgia […]

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