Tag Archives: Virology

Common cold viruses originated in camels, just like MERS

There are four globally endemic human coronaviruses which, together with the better known rhinoviruses, are responsible for causing common colds. Usually, infections with these viruses are harmless to humans. DZIF Professor Christian Drosten, Institute of Virology at the University Hospital of Bonn, and his research team have now found the source of “HCoV-229E,” one of […]

Tags: ,

Stress bites! Researchers study mosquito/bird interactions

Research shows stressed-out birds more attractive to mosquitoes, raising fears birds exposed to stressors such as road noise, pesticides and light pollution, will be bitten more often and spread more West Nile virus When researchers from the University of South Florida (USF) and colleagues investigated how the stress hormone, corticosterone, affects how birds cope with […]

Tags: , ,

* How norovirus gets inside cells: New clues

Norovirus is the most common viral cause of diarrhea worldwide, but scientists still know little about how it infects people and causes disease because the virus grows poorly in the lab. The discovery, in mice, provides new ways to study a virus notoriously hard to work with and may lead to treatments or a vaccine. […]

Tags: , ,

Zika infection may affect adult brain cells

Concerns over the Zika virus have focused on pregnant women due to mounting evidence that it causes brain abnormalities in developing fetuses. However, new research in mice from scientists at The Rockefeller University and La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology suggests that certain adult brain cells may be vulnerable to infection as well. Among […]

Tags: , ,

* Gene therapy treats all muscles in the body in muscular dystrophy dogs

Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the U.S., occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, fatty or bony tissue and loses function. For years, scientists have searched for a way to successfully treat the most common form of the disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which primarily affects boys. Now, a team […]

Tags: , ,

Scientists identify immunological profiles of people who make powerful HIV antibodies

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. While bNAbs cannot completely clear HIV infections in people who have already acquired the virus, many scientists believe a successful preventive HIV vaccine must induce bNAbs. The […]

Tags: , ,

DNA’s dynamic nature makes it well-suited to serve as the blueprint of life

A new study could explain why DNA and not RNA, its older chemical cousin, is the main repository of genetic information. The DNA double helix is a more forgiving molecule that can contort itself into different shapes to absorb chemical damage to the basic building blocks — A, G, C and T — of genetic […]

Tags: ,

Viruses revealed to be a major driver of human evolution

The constant battle between pathogens and their hosts has long been recognized as a key driver of evolution, but until now scientists have not had the tools to look at these patterns globally across species and genomes. In a new study, researchers apply big-data analysis to reveal the full extent of viruses’ impact on the […]

Tags: , ,

HPV vaccine can protect women across a broad age range

A research paper published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is safe and efficacious across a wide age range of women. The international study found that it protects against HPV infection in women older than 26 years. Vaccination programs worldwide currently target routine vaccination of women 26 years and […]

Tags: , ,

* Model helps identify drugs to treat cat eye infections

It’s a problem veterinarians see all the time, but there are few treatments. Feline herpes virus 1 (FHV-1) is a frequent cause of eye infections in cats, but the drugs available to treat these infections must be applied multiple times a day and there is scant scientific evidence to support their use. Now scientists at […]

Tags: , ,

HPV vaccine reduced cervical abnormalities in young women

Posted on

Young women who received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine through a school-based program had fewer cervical cell anomalies when screened for cervical cancer, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). “Eight years after a school-based HPV vaccination program was initiated in Alberta, 3-dose HPV vaccination has demonstrated early benefits, particularly against high-grade […]

Tags: , ,

On the path to controlled gene therapy

Posted on

The ability to switch disease-causing genes on and off remains a dream for many physicians, research scientists and patients. Research teams from across the world are busy turning this dream into a reality, including a team of researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg. Led by […]

Tags: , ,

Itchy inflammation of mosquito bites helps viruses replicate

Posted on

Mosquito bite sites are not just itchy, irritating nuisances — they also make viral infections spread by the insects far worse, new research has found. The study, led by the University of Leeds, found that inflammation where the insect has bitten not only helps a virus such as Zika or dengue establish an infection in […]

Tags: , ,

A new way to nip AIDS in the bud

Posted on

Now, University of Utah researchers found a way to turn protease into a double-edged sword: They showed that if they delay the budding of new HIV particles, protease itself will destroy the virus instead of helping it spread. They say that might lead, in about a decade, to new kinds of AIDS drugs with fewer […]

Tags: ,

Neurologic symptoms common in early HIV infection

Posted on

A team led by researchers from UCSF and Yale has found that half of people newly infected with HIV experience neurologic issues. These neurologic findings are generally not severe and usually resolve after participants started anti-retroviral therapy. “We were surprised that neurologic findings were so pervasive in participants diagnosed with very recent HIV infection,” said […]

Tags: , ,

Making virus sensors cheap and simple: New method detects single viruses in urine

Posted on

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a new method to rapidly detect a single virus in urine, as reported this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. While the technique presently works on just one virus, scientists say it could be adapted to detect a range of […]

Tags: ,

Experimental drug against hepatitis C slows down Zika virus infection in mice

Posted on

Virologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that an experimental antiviral drug against hepatitis C slows down the development of Zika in mice. The research team was led by Professor Johan Neyts from the Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy. “The Zika virus is transmitted by the tiger mosquito. Roughly twenty percent of the people who […]

Tags: ,

Mouse models of Zika in pregnancy show how fetuses become infected

Posted on

Two mouse models of Zika virus infection in pregnancy have been developed by a team of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. In them, the virus migrated from the pregnant mouse’s bloodstream into the placenta, where it multiplied, then spread into the fetal circulation and infected the brains of the developing […]

Tags: ,

Zika virus may cause microcephaly by hijacking human immune molecule

Posted on

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently concluded that Zika virus infection in pregnant women can stunt neonatal brain development, leading to babies born with abnormally small heads, a condition known as microcephaly. Now, for the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have determined one way Zika […]

Tags: , ,

A real Peter Rabbit tale: Biologists find key to myxoma virus/rabbit coevolution

Posted on

A naturally-occurring mutation in a rabbit-specific virus — related to the smallpox virus — weakens the virus and may give insight to understanding pathogen evolution, according to a Kansas State University study. “Our findings may help scientists predict which viruses can pose threats to humans,” said Stefan Rothenburg, assistant professor in the Division of Biology […]

Tags: ,

Developing ways to study influenza D virus

Posted on

Although a new influenza virus, now called influenza D, was discovered first in pigs, researchers found it was more common in cattle. However, further research has identified antibodies to the virus in small ruminants, but not in poultry. To identify exposure to the virus, South Dakota State University doctoral student Chithra Sreenivasan tests blood samples […]

Tags: ,

* Canine influenza transmitted to cats in Midwestern shelter

Posted on

It may be called canine influenza, but Sandra Newbury, clinical assistant professor and director of the Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, has confirmed that the virus that sickened a large number of dogs in the Midwest last year has now infected a group of cats in the region. […]

Tags: , ,

Likely biological link found between Zika virus, microcephaly

Posted on

Working with lab-grown human stem cells, a team of researchers suspect they have discovered how the Zika virus probably causes microcephaly in fetuses. The virus selectively infects cells that form the brain’s cortex, or outer layer, making them more likely to die and less likely to divide normally and make new brain cells. The researchers […]

Tags: , ,

New virus transmission route discovered in pigs

Japanese Encephalitis (JE) virus causes serious inflammation of the brain in people and fertility problems in pigs. Mosquitoes were previously the only known transmission route. However, the virus can also be spread from pig to pig by direct contact, and this could enable it to circulate in pigs during the mosquito-free winter season. The JE […]

Tags: ,

Zika researchers release real-time data on viral infection study in monkeys

Researchers in the United States who have infected monkeys with Zika virus made their first data public last week.  But instead  of publishing them in a journal, they have released them online for anyone to view- and are updating their results day by day. The team is posting raw data on the amount of virus detected […]

Tags: , ,

Zika virus linked to stillbirth, other symptoms in Brazil

In January, a pregnant Brazilian woman infected with the Zika virus had a stillborn baby who had signs of severe tissue swelling as well as central nervous system defects that caused near-complete loss of brain tissue. It is the first report to indicate a possible association of congenital Zika virus and damage to tissues outside […]

Tags: ,

Experimental Ebola antibody protects monkeys

Scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues have discovered that a single monoclonal antibody–a protein that attacks viruses–isolated from a human Ebola virus disease survivor protected non-human primates when given as late as five days after lethal Ebola infection. The antibody can […]

Tags: ,

* Electron microscopy captures snapshot of structure coronaviruses use to enter cells

High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy and supercomputing have now made it possible to analyze in detail the infection mechanisms of coronaviruses. These viruses are notorious for attacking the respiratory tract of humans and animals. A research team that included scientists from the University of Washington (UW), the Pasteur Institute and the University of Utrecht has obtained an […]

Tags: ,

* Zika virus might cause Guillain-Barré syndrome, according to new evidence

Analysis of blood samples from 42 patients diagnosed with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) during the Zika virus outbreak in French Polynesia provides the first evidence that Zika virus might cause GBS, a severe neurological disorder, according to new research published in The Lancet today. Based on the analysis of data from French Polynesia, if 100000 people […]

Tags: , ,

Effectiveness of a herpesvirus CMV-based vaccine against Ebola

Posted on

This study represents a crucial step in the translation of herpesvirus-based Ebola virus vaccines into humans and other great apes. As the latest in a series of studies, researchers at Plymouth University, National Institutes of Health and University of California, Riverside, have shown the ability of a vaccine vector based on a common herpesvirus called […]

Tags: , ,

Sidebar