Tag Archives: Anaesthesiology

‘Off switch’ for pain discovered: Activating the adenosine A3 receptor subtype is key to powerful pain relief

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other academic institutions have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain including pain caused by chemotherapeutic agents and bone cancer pain […]

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How brain ‘reboots’ itself to consciousness after anesthesia

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One of the great mysteries of anesthesia is how patients can be temporarily rendered completely unresponsive during surgery and then wake up again, with their memories and skills intact. A new study by Dr. Andrew Hudson, an assistant professor in anesthesiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and colleagues provides important clues […]

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To recover consciousness, brain activity passes through newly detected states

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“I always found it remarkable that someone can recover from anesthesia, not only that you blink your eyes and can walk around, but you return to being yourself. So if you learned how to do something on Sunday and on Monday, you have surgery, and you wake up and you still know how to do […]

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Mice that feel less pain live longer

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Scientists have found a way to beat back the hands of time and fight the ravages of old age, at least in mice. A new study finds that mice bred without a specific pain sensor, or receptor, live longer and are less likely to develop diseases such as diabetes in old age. What’s more, exposure […]

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* One molecule blocks both pain and itch, discovered in mouse study

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The new antibody works by targeting the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the cell membrane of neurons. The results appear online on May 22 in Cell. Voltage-sensitive sodium channels control the flow of sodium ions through the neuron’s membrane. These channels open and close by responding to the electric current or action potential of the cells. […]

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Untreated cancer pain a ‘scandal of global proportions,’ survey shows

A ground-breaking international collaborative survey, published today in Annals of Oncology, shows that more than half of the world’s population live in countries where regulations that aim to stem drug misuse leave cancer patients without access to opioid medicines for managing cancer pain. The results from the Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI) project show that […]

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Epigenetics a key to controlling acute and chronic pain

Epigenetics, the study of changes in gene expression through mechanisms outside of the DNA structure, has been found to control a key pain receptor related to surgical incision pain, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology. This study reveals new information about pain regulation in the spinal cord. “Postoperative pain is an […]

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Scientists confirm functionality of emergency ventilation system for horses

Respiratory or cardiovascular arrest in outdoor animals poses a huge challenge to veterinarians. Ventilation equipment is generally hard to operate and requires electricity and compressed air. Anaesthesiologists at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) have developed an inexpensive device for the ventilation of large animals. It is easy to transport and can save […]

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Best way to kill lab animals sought

Researchers debate most humane methods of dispatch. Killing research animals is one of the most unpleasant tasks in science, and it is imperative to do it as humanely as possible. But researchers who study animal welfare and euthanasia are growing increasingly concerned that widely used techniques are not the least painful and least stressful available. […]

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Concerns about anesthesia’s impact on the brain

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As pediatric specialists become increasingly aware that surgical anesthesia may have lasting effects on the developing brains of young children, new research suggests the threat may also apply to adult brains. Researchers from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center report June 5 the Annals of Neurology that testing in laboratory mice shows anesthesia’s neurotoxic effects depend […]

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Are patients under anesthesia really unconscious?

EEG can be used to make sure you’re really under. The prospect of undergoing surgery while not fully “under” may sound like the stuff of horror movies. But one patient in a thousand remembers moments of awareness while under general anesthesia, physicians estimate. The memories are sometimes neutral images or sounds of the operating room, […]

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Longer cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves survival in both children and adults

Experts from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia were among the leaders of two large national U.S. studies showing that extending cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) longer than previously thought useful saves lives in both children and adults. The research teams analyzed impact of duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients who suffered cardiac arrest while hospitalized. “These findings […]

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Scientists home in on cause of osteoarthritis pain

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center, in collaboration with researchers at Northwestern University, have identified a molecular mechanism central to the development of osteoarthritis (OA) pain, a finding that could have major implications for future treatment of this often-debilitating condition. “Clinically, scientists have focused on trying to understand how cartilage and joints degenerate in osteoarthritis. […]

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Rodent euthanasia methods under scrutiny

Study shows anaesthetics may be a more humane way to kill rats and mice than carbon dioxide, but reveals a surprising twist. Albino laboratory rats find carbon dioxide — a gas commonly used for euthanising them — even more unpleasant than bright light. One particularly fraught challenge for animal research is finding humane ways to […]

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By improving pain treatment and therapy in dogs, research offers medical insight for humans

A Kansas State University professor’s research improving post-surgery pain treatment and osteoarthritis therapy in dogs may help develop better ways to treat humans for various medical conditions. From the use of hot and cold packs to new forms of narcotics, James Roush, professor of clinical sciences, is studying ways to lessen pain after surgery and […]

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Popular pain-relieving medicines linked to hearing loss in women

Analgesics are the most frequently used medications in the United States and are commonly used to treat a variety of medical conditions. But although popping a pill may make the pain go away, it may do some damage to your ears. According to a study by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), women who […]

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Discovery of essential genes for drug-resistant bacteria reveals new, high-value drug targets

Biomedical scientists collaborating on translational research at two Buffalo institutions are reporting the discovery of a novel, and heretofore unrecognized, set of genes essential for the growth of potentially lethal, drug-resistant bacteria. The study not only reveals multiple, new drug targets for this human infection, it also suggests that the typical methods of studying bacteria […]

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The big sleep: How do you anesthetize a hippopotamus?

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It may rank fairly low in most lists of pressing problems to be solved but an increasing number of zoos and wildlife collections as well as gamekeepers nevertheless need to come up with an answer: How do you anesthetize a hippopotamus? Difficulties are posed not only by the undesirability of approaching waking animals but also […]

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Regional anesthesia reduces complications and death for hip fracture patients

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In a study of more than 18,000 patients having surgery for hip fracture, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that the use of regional anesthesia versus general anesthesia, was associated with a significant reduction in major pulmonary complications and death. The new study will be published in the […]

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Share local anesthetic stops pain at the source after hip replacement surgery

In patients undergoing hip replacement surgery, using a special wound catheter to infuse local anesthetic directly into the hip joint provides significant and lasting improvements in postoperative pain control, reports a study in the February issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). By stopping pain at the source, […]

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High-dose opiates could crack chronic pain

Powerful analgesics can restore normal nerve function. Has a cheap and effective treatment for chronic pain been lying under clinicians’ noses for decades? Researchers have found that a very high dose of an opiate drug that uses the same painkilling pathways as morphine can reset the nerve signals associated with continuous pain — at least […]

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Does that hurt? Objective way to measure pain being developed

Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine have taken a first step toward developing a diagnostic tool that could eliminate a major hurdle in pain medicine — the dependency on self-reporting to measure the presence or absence of pain. The new tool would use patterns of brain activity to give an objective physiologic assessment […]

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Compound offers pain relief without the complications

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The synthesis of a natural pain reliever could lead to an analgesic without serious side effects. The pinwheel flower (Tabernaemontana divaricata) contains miniscule amounts of the pain-relieving compound conolidine. Chemists have succeeded in synthesising a natural compound that shows promise as a painkiller — and might not cause the side effects that bedevil analgesics currently […]

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Introducing the world’s first intubation robot

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Researchers have introduced the first intubation robot operated by remote control. The robotic system — named The Kepler Intubation System (KIS), and developed by Dr. Thomas M. Hemmerling, McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) specialist and McGill University Professor of Anesthesia and his team — may facilitate the intubation procedure and reduce some complications associated with […]

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Pain therapy for piglets

Torunn Krangnes Fosse’s doctoral thesis shows that piglets of different age groups have a unique ability to break down and excrete painkillers. She also demonstrates that the painkilling and anti-inflammatory effect of the medicines studied work to varying degrees on piglets. The results of her research will be important for the choice of medicine and […]

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Uncovering the neurobiological basis of general anesthesia

The use of general anesthesia is a routine part of surgical operations at hospitals and medical facilities around the world, but the precise biological mechanisms that underlie anesthetic drugs’ effects on the brain and the body are only beginning to be understood. A review article in the December 30 New England Journal of Medicine brings […]

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Anesthetic gases heats climate as much as one million cars

When doctors want their patients asleep during surgery, they gently turn the gas tap. But anesthetic gasses have a global warming potential as high as a refrigerant that is on its way to be banned in the European Union. Yet there is no obligation to report anesthetic gasses along with other greenhouse gasses such as […]

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Propofol poses low risk in pediatric imaging studies, but risk increases with anesthesia duration, study finds

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A new study finds that propofol, a well-known anesthesia medication, has a low occurrence of adverse events for children undergoing research-driven imaging studies. The study, led by a pediatric anesthesiologist now at Children’s National Medical Center, showed a low incidence of adverse events and no long term complications when propofol was used to sedate children […]

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Mice may make morphine

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Mice can synthesize morphine from various intermediate chemicals. Meinhart Zenk of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St Louis, Missouri, and colleagues detected traces of morphine in the urine of mice after injecting chemical precursors of the drug. They report their findings today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Like other […]

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Brain responses during anesthesia mimic those during natural deep sleep

The brains of people under anesthesia respond to stimuli as they do in the deepest part of sleep — lending credence to a developing theory of consciousness and suggesting a new method to assess loss of consciousness in conditions such as coma. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, led […]

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