Tag Archives: Cats

Mycobacterium bovis infection in humans and cats in same household, Texas, USA, 2012

Mycobacterium bovis infection of cats is exceedingly rare in regions where bovine tuberculosis is not endemic. We describe the diagnosis and clinical management of pulmonary M. bovis infection in 2 indoor-housed cats and their association with at least 1 M. bovis–infected human in Texas, USA, in September 2012. Tuberculosis in humans and animals results from […]

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* Rabies booster defends pets with out-of-date vaccination against the disease

A new study by Kansas State University veterinary diagnosticians finds that pets with out-of-date rabies vaccinations are very unlikely to develop the fatal disease if given a rabies booster immediately after exposure to the virus. The finding gives pet owners, veterinarians and public health officials new options when faced with the difficult situation of quarantining […]

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* Cats claw their way into genetics

The cat genome is out of the bag, and has already helped to pinpoint a gene involved in kidney disease. Cats may have beaten dogs on the Internet but felines have been a rare breed in genetics labs compared with their canine counterparts. Now, at last, cats are clawing their way into genomics. At a […]

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* Cat genome reveals clues to domestication​​

Cats and humans have shared the same households for at least 9,000 years, but we still know very little about how our feline friends became domesticated. An analysis of the cat genome led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals some surprising clues. he research appears Nov. 10 in the […]

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Cat dentals fill you with dread?

A survey published this year found that over 50% of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don’t always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many […]

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* Cheetah menu: Wildlife instead of cattle

Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) can give the all-clear: in a recent study they showed that cheetahs primarily prefer wildlife on their menu. The cheetah is a vulnerable species that only exists on Namibia’s commercial farmland in large populations. Here, local farmers see cheetahs as a potential threat […]

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Nasty parasitic worm, common in wildlife, now infecting U. S. cats

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When Cornell University veterinarians found half-foot-long worms living in their feline patients, they had discovered something new: The worms, Dracunculus insignis, had never before been seen in cats. “First Report of Dracunculus Insignis in Two Naturally Infected Cats from the Northeastern USA,” published in the February issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, […]

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Humans responsible for 62% of cougar deaths in re-established population

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The reintroduction of mountain lions across the mid-western United States has made species management an urgent area of research for conservationists. A report in the Wildlife Society Bulletin explores the fatal cost of human interaction with cougars and asks what state agencies can do to protect both species. Cougars (Puma concolor) are slowly recolonizing their […]

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Cat parasite found in western Arctic Beluga deemed infectious

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University of British Columbia scientists have found for the first time an infectious form of the cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii in western Arctic Beluga, prompting a health advisory to the Inuit people who eat whale meat. The same team also discovered a new strain of the parasite, previously sequestered in the icy north, that is […]

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Cat domestication traced to Chinese farmers 5,300 years ago

Five-thousand years before it was immortalized in a British nursery rhyme, the cat that caught the rat that ate the malt was doing just fine living alongside farmers in the ancient Chinese village of Quanhucun, a forthcoming study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has confirmed. “At least three different lines of […]

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Fossil of new big cat species discovered: Oldest ever found

The oldest big cat fossil ever found — which fills in a significant gap in the fossil record — was discovered on a paleontological dig in Tibet, scientists announced today. A skull from the new species, named Panthera blytheae, was excavated and described by a team led by Jack Tseng — a PhD student at […]

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Ancient cat may reshape feline family tree

The world’s first big cats may have arisen millions of years earlier than previously thought. That’s the conclusion researchers are drawing from a newly discovered species of feline, similar to today’s snow leopard, that lived in the ancient Himalayas. Though the creature doesn’t have any living descendants, it may force researchers to rethink the cat […]

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Australian cats and foxes may not deserve their bad rep

Foxes and feral cats are wildly unpopular among Australian conservationists. The two animals are infamous for killing off the continent’s native species, and they’ve been the targets of numerous government-backed eradication campaigns. But new research suggests that on Australian islands, these predators help control an even more destructive one: the black rat. As a result, […]

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Parasites in cat feces: Potential public health problem?

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Each year in the United States, cats deposit about 1.2 million metric tons of feces into the environment, and that poop is carrying with it what may be a vast and underappreciated public health problem, say scientists July 9 in the journal Trends in Parasitology, a Cell Press publication. Some of that poop is laden […]

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Wild cheetah accelerate fast and reach speeds of up to 58 miles per hour during a hunt

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Researchers at the Royal Veterinary College have captured the first detailed information on the hunting dynamics of the wild cheetah in its natural habitat. Using an innovative GPS and motion sensing collar that they designed, Professor Alan Wilson and his team were able to record remarkable speeds of up to 58 miles per hour (or […]

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Museum find proves exotic ‘big cat’ prowled British countryside a century ago

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The rediscovery of a mystery animal in a museum’s underground storeroom proves that a non-native ‘big cat’ prowled the British countryside at the turn of the last century. The animal’s skeleton and mounted skin was analysed by a multi-disciplinary team of Durham University scientists and fellow researchers at Bristol, Southampton and Aberystwyth universities and found […]

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Study of pumas in Santa Cruz Mountains documents impact of predator/human interaction

In the first published results of more than three years of tracking mountain lions in the Santa Cruz Mountains, UC Santa Cruz researchers document how human development affects the predators’ habits. In findings published April 17 in the online journal PLOS ONE, UCSC associate professor of environmental studies Chris Wilmers and colleagues with the UC […]

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Cryopreservation: A chance for highly endangered mammals

Oocytes of lions, tigers and other cat species survive the preservation in liquid nitrogen. Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in Berlin succeeded in carrying out cryopreservation of felid ovary cortex. “We have successfully frozen and thawed oocytes in the ovary cortex of different cat species at minus 196 degrees […]

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Amblyopia cat: Turn off the lights

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A new study in cats reveals that even brief periods in total darkness can correct the vision disorder amblyopia. A stint in the dark may be just what the doctor ordered—at least if you have “lazy eye.” Researchers report that kittens with the disorder, a visual impairment medically known as amblyopia that leads to poor […]

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How the tabby got its blotches

Domestic cats often resemble their larger, wilder counterparts—with black, striped, or tawny fur that presumably helps the big hunters blend into the landscape. For scientists, the genes involved in the evolution of cats’ color patterns have been equally well-camouflaged. But a new study appearing online today in Science reveals a mutation shared by housecats and […]

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First ever videos of snow leopard mother and cubs in dens recorded in Mongolia

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For the first time, the den sites of two female snow leopards and their cubs have been located in Mongolia’s Tost Mountains, with the first known videos taken of a mother and cubs, located and recorded by scientists from Panthera, a wild cat conservation organization, and the Snow Leopard Trust (SLT). Because of the snow […]

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Skulls shed new light on the evolution of the cat

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Modern cats diverged in skull shape from their sabre-toothed ancestors early in their evolutionary history and then followed separate evolutionary trajectories, according to new research from the University of Bristol published today in PLoS ONE. The study also found that the separation between modern domestic cats and big cats such as lions and tigers is […]

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Highly divergent novel lyssavirus in an African civet

Evidence in support of a novel lyssavirus was obtained from brain samples of an African civet in Tanzania. Results of phylogenetic analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences from representative Lyssavirus species and this novel lyssavirus provided strong empirical evidence that this is a new lyssavirus species, designated Ikoma lyssavirus. Eleven Lyssavirus species have been classified: Rabies […]

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Risk factors for cat cancer could have human implications

A recent, large-scale study on cat intestinal cancer has provided new insight into a common pet disease and its causes; the findings could ultimately benefit humans. We are looking for patterns of cancer development in animals, so we can find common risk factors,” said Kim Selting, associate teaching professor of oncology at the MU College […]

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Glowing kittens fight feline AIDS

Scientists have genetically modified cats by infecting their eggs with a virus containing a foreign gene—the first time this method has worked in a carnivore. Experts say the advance could make the cat a valuable new genetic model—and potentially protect it from an HIV-like virus. There are two AIDS epidemics in the world: one in […]

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The low genetic diversity of the Iberian lynx may not decrease the species’ chance of survival

Research looking at DNA from Iberian lynx fossils shows that they have had very little genetic variation over the last 50,000 years, suggesting that a small long-term population size is the ‘norm’ in the species and has not hampered their survival. The new study is published in the journal Molecular Ecology. Conservationists previously thought that […]

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Few replicas as first cloned cat nears 10

She may be slowing down a bit these days, and her grey and white figure has gotten a bit plump after giving birth to kittens three years ago, but that’s part of what makes CC so extraordinary: she is completely normal. “People expect there to be something different about her,” said Duane Kraemer, a Texas […]

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Bolstering genetic diversity among cheetahs

Researchers at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute have discovered why older females are rarely able to reproduce — and hope to use this information to introduce vital new genes into the pool. SCBI scientists and collaborating researchers analyzed hormones, eggs and the uteri of 34 cheetahs at eight institutions, and determined that while the hormones […]

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Protein helps parasite survive in host cells

Toxoplasma gondii and other related parasites surround themselves with a membrane to protect against factors in host cells that would otherwise kill them. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a parasite protein that protects this membrane from host proteins that can rupture it. According to the researchers, disabling the […]

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Even healthy cats act sick when their routine is disrupted

A cat regularly vomiting hairballs or refusing to eat probably isn’t being finicky or otherwise “cat-like,” despite what conventional wisdom might say. There is a good chance that the cat is acting sick because of the stress caused by changes in its environment, new research suggests. Healthy cats were just as likely as chronically ill […]

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