Tag Archives: Endocrinology

Long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid use may impact visuospatial memory

The long-term use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) may severely impact the user’s ability to accurately recall the shapes and spatial relationships of objects, according to a recent study conducted by McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School investigators. In the study, published December 14 online in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, McLean Hospital Research Psychiatrist […]

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Hormone combination effective and safe for treating obesity in mice

Scientists at Indiana University and international collaborators have found a way to link two hormones into a single molecule, producing a more effective therapy with fewer side effects for potential use as treatment for obesity and related medical conditions. The studies were carried out in the laboratories of Richard DiMarchi, the Standiford H. Cox Distinguished […]

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Thyroid is latest success in regenerative medicine

A series of achievements have stoked excitement about the potential of regenerative medicine, which aims to tackle diseases by replacing or regenerating damaged cells, tissues and organs. A paper in Nature reports another step towards this goal: the generation of working thyroid cells from stem cells. Sabine Costagliola, a molecular embryologist at the Free University […]

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Recovering ‘bodyguard’ cells in pancreas may restore insulin production in diabetics

The key to restoring production of insulin in type I diabetic patients, previously known as juvenile diabetes, may be in recovering the population of protective cells known T regulatory cells in the lymph nodes at the “gates” of the pancreas, a new preclinical study published online October 8 in Cellular & Molecular Immunology by researchers […]

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Overweight? There’s a vaccine for that

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New vaccines promote weight loss. A new study, published in BioMed Central’s open access journal, Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, assesses the effectiveness of two somatostatin vaccinations, JH17 and JH18, in reducing weight gain and increasing weight loss in mice. Obesity and obesity-related disease is a growing health issue worldwide. Somatostatin, a peptide hormone, […]

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Variations in sex steroid gene expression can predict aggressive behaviors, bird study shows

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An Indiana University biologist has shown that natural variation in measures of the brain’s ability to process steroid hormones predicts functional variation in aggressive behavior. The new work led by Kimberly A. Rosvall, a postdoctoral fellow and assistant research scientist in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology, has found strong […]

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Remote-controlled genes trigger insulin production

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Researchers have remotely activated genes inside living animals, a proof of concept that could one day lead to medical procedures in which patients’ genes are triggered on demand. The work, in which a team used radio waves to switch on engineered insulin-producing genes in mice, is published in Science. Jeffrey Friedman, a molecular geneticist at […]

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Songbird brain synapses and glial cells capable of synthesizing estrogen

Colin Saldanha, a biology professor at American University, has always been intrigued by the hormone estrogen. Specifically, how the hormone that does so much (for example, it promotes sexual behavior in women but can also increase susceptibility to seizures) does not cause major cross circuit meltdowns. “In the extreme case, once every 28 days, women […]

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Lab-grown hormone factory put to work

The pituitary gland houses a factory of hormone-producing cells. Stress responses, energy use and growth are all regulated by signals that originate in this pea-sized section of brain, which sits near the base of the skull. Treatment for a dysfunctional pituitary gland is regular hormone injections. Yoshiki Sasai of the RIKEN Centre for Developmental Biology […]

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Preventing pancreatic cell death in type 1 diabetes

Diabetes researchers at Yale University have developed a method to detect and measure the destruction of beta cells that occurs in the pancreas by measuring DNA expression in the blood. The destruction of beta cells leads, over time, to type 1 diabetes. Their finding could ultimately lead to a treatment that stops the progression of […]

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Natural compound helps reverse diabetes in mice

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have restored normal blood sugar metabolism in diabetic mice using a compound the body makes naturally. The finding suggests that it may one day be possible for people to take the compound much like a daily vitamin as a way to treat or even prevent […]

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Pituitary hormone TSH found to directly influence bone growth

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone produced in the anterior pituitary gland that regulates endocrine function in the thyroid gland, can promote bone growth independent of its usual thyroid functions. The research suggests that TSH, or drugs that mimic its affect on bone, may be key […]

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A tool to measure stress hormone in birds: Feathers

When faced with environmental threats like bad weather, predators or oil spills, wild birds secrete a hormone called corticosterone. Traditionally, researchers have analyzed blood samples to detect corticosterone levels in wild birds. But recently, scientists have shown that corticosterone spikes can also be detected by analyzing bird feathers. A Tufts University study published in the […]

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Hormone reduces risk of heart failure from chemotherapy

Recent studies have shown that the heart contains cardiac stem cells that can contribute to regeneration and healing during disease and aging. However, little is known about the molecules and pathways that regulate these cells. Now, a new study utilizing a heart failure model is providing insight into one way to coax the cardiac stem […]

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New cell type offers immunology hope

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Scientists in Australia have discovered a new type of cell in the immune system. The new cell type, a kind of white blood cell, belongs to a family of T-cells that play a critical role in protection against infectious disease. Their findings could ultimately lead to the development of novel drugs that strengthen the immune […]

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Alternative approach to treating diabetes tested

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In a mouse study, scientists at Mayo Clinic Florida have demonstrated the feasibility of a promising new strategy for treating human type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 200 million people worldwide. In type 2 diabetes, the body stops responding efficiently to insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar. To compensate for the insensitivity to […]

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New method to measure cortisol could lead to better understanding of development of common diseases

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A new method to measure the amount of the stress hormone cortisol found in the body over the long term could lead to new research avenues to study the development of common conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and depression. In results announced at the European Congress of Endocrinology, researchers found that hair can be […]

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Hunger hormone enhances sense of smell

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An appetite-stimulating hormone causes people and animals to sniff odors more often and with greater sensitivity, according to a new study in the April 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings suggest ghrelin may enhance the ability to find and identify food. Researchers led by Jenny Tong, MD, and Matthias Tschöp, MD, at […]

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Estrogen treatment with no side effects in sight

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Estrogen treatment for osteoporosis has often been associated with serious side effects. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now, in mice, found a way of utilizing the positive effects of estrogen in mice so that only the skeleton is acted on, current research at the Academy shows. The study is presented […]

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Mouse studies suggest bone hormone affects male fertility.

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Osteocalcin seems to promote production of the sex steroid hormone testosterone, and reduce fertility, in male mice, according to a study led by Gerard Karsenty, a geneticist at Columbia University in New York, and published in Cell. Decreases in sex steroid hormones can lead to loss of bone mass in humans. Karsenty and his colleagues […]

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Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can affect quality of life even when thyroid gland function is normal

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Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), an inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, but a study has suggested that even when thyroid function is normal, HT may increase symptoms and decrease quality of life, as described in an article in Thyroid, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis […]

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Home urine test measures insulin production in diabetes

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A simple home urine test has been developed which can measure if patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are producing their own insulin. The urine test, from Professor Andrew Hattersley’s Exeter-based team at the Peninsula Medical School, replaces multiple blood tests in hospital and can be sent by post as it is stable […]

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Hormonal therapy for older, pregnant horses?

Like humans, horses are prone to miscarriage. In fact, about one in ten pregnancies results in miscarriage at a very early stage. Some horses have a history of early miscarriages and it has become customary to treat them with a type of progestin known as altrenogest, although there have not been any studies to assess […]

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‘Un-growth hormone’ increases longevity

A compound which acts in the opposite way as growth hormone can reverse some of the signs of aging, a research team that includes a Saint Louis University physician has shown. The finding may be counter-intuitive to some older adults who take growth hormone, thinking it will help revitalize them. Their research was published in […]

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Stopping diabetes damage with vitamin C

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June 9th, 2009 Researchers at the Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center have found a way to stop the damage caused by Type 1 diabetes with the combination of insulin and a common vitamin found in most medicine cabinets. While neither therapy produced desired results when used alone, the combination of insulin to control blood sugar […]

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Estrogen activates critical lung genes to improve lung function following preterm birth

Estrogen may be a new postnatal therapy to improve lung function and other outcomes in preterm infants, researchers at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center have found in an animal study. “Ironically, a hormone that has received great attention as a potential means to optimize the health of older women may be a […]

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Haven’t I seen you before?

The next time you spot an old friend from across the room, thank oxytocin. Researchers have shown that the brain hormone helps us sense whether a face is familiar. Oxytocin is a powerful social chemical. In voles, for example, the hormone is key to attachment behavior: Males with higher levels of oxytocin are more likely […]

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Steroids aid recovery from pneumonia

Adding corticosteroids to traditional antimicrobial therapy might help people with pneumonia recover more quickly than with antibiotics alone, UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have found. Unlike the anabolic steroids used to bulk up muscle, corticosteroids are often used to treat inflammation related to infectious diseases, such as bacterial meningitis. Used against other infectious diseases, however, […]

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Iodine-deficiency disorders

2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. […]

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Stress hormone found to regulate brain neurotransmission

When we are subjected to a stress, our adrenal glands secrete hormones that affect our entire body. One of these hormones, cortisol, enables us to adapt physically and mentally to the stimulus. Following a major or repeated stress that the individual has no control over, however, cortisol is secreted in great quantities over a long […]

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