Tag Archives: Surgery (Orthopeadics)

Novel surgery removes rare tumor, rebuilds trachea

Using a novel surgical approach, it’s possible to rebuild the trachea and preserve a patient’s voice after removing an invasive throat tumor, according to a new report from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. This case study is the first of its kind to not only document a successful technique to create a fully functional trachea, […]

Tags: , ,

Robotic surgery of ‘tremendous benefit’ to patients

Robot-assisted surgery dramatically improves outcomes in patients with uterine, endometrial, and cervical cancer, said researchers at the Jewish General Hospital’s Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research in Montreal. Moreover, because of fewer post-operative complications and shorter hospital stays, robotic procedures also cost less. These results were published in late 2010 in a series of studies […]

Tags: , ,

Five-year results show keyhole bowel cancer surgery as safe and effective

Laparoscopic or ‘keyhole’ surgery is a safe, effective way of removing bowel tumours and should be offered to all patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, according to researchers from the University of Leeds. Patients who have laparoscopic surgery spend less time in hospital and recover more quickly from the operation. Now long-term follow-up data has […]

Tags: , ,

Origin of skillful stone-tool-sharpening method pushed back more than 50,000 years

A highly skillful and delicate method of sharpening and retouching stone artifacts by prehistoric people appears to have been developed at least 75,000 years ago, more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. A paper on the subject was published in the […]

Tags: ,

Early success with laser that destroys tumors with heat

Physicians at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus are among the first in the nation to use a technique known as MRI-guided laser ablation to heat up and destroy kidney and liver tumors. So far, five patients have been successfully treated — meaning no visible tumors remained after the procedure. Although the treatment techniques are in the […]

Tags: , ,

SpectroPen could help surgeons see the edges of tumors in human patients in real time during surgery

Biomedical engineers are developing a hand-held device called a SpectroPen that could help surgeons see the edges of tumors in human patients in real time during surgery. Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of Pennsylvania describe the device in an article published this week in the […]

Tags: , ,

Surgeons expand the use of scar-free surgical technique to more patients

A team of surgeons from Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York who have pioneered scar-free gallbladder removal are offering the procedure to all suitable patients and extending this new type of surgical procedure to other operations in the abdomen. They reported on their updated findings October 6 at the 2010 Annual Clinical Congress of the […]

Tags: , ,

Surgery: No sponge left behind

Using the same technology found in clothing tags used in retail store tracking systems, a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that surgical sponges with implanted radio frequency (RF) tags may be an effective adjunct to manual counting and X-ray detection in preventing sponges from being left behind in patients […]

Tags: , ,

How to control massive bleeding from the hepatic artery

Delayed hepatic arterial hemorrhage after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is not a common but a fatal complication, occurring in 7% of all patients. Its ideal management remains unclear and controversial. A research article published on August 7, 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The authors reported the clinical outcome of 9 patients with […]

Tags: , ,

Scarless brain surgery is new option for patients

Surgeons at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine and University of Washington Medical Center have determined that transorbital neuroendoscopic surgery (TONES) is a safe and effective option for treating a variety of advanced brain diseases and traumatic injuries. This groundbreaking minimally invasive surgery is performed through the eye socket, thus eliminating the […]

Tags: , ,

Sepsis and septic shock more common than heart attacks or pulmonary blood clots after general surgery

Sepsis and septic shock appear to be more common than heart attacks or pulmonary blood clots among patients having general surgery, and the death rate for patients with septic shock is approximately 34 percent within 30 days of operation, according to a report in the July issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives […]

Tags: , ,

Surgery linked to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, according to Spanish study

Posted on

A new study spearheaded by Spanish scientists demonstrates a causal relationship between the onset of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), caused by a protein called a prion, and general surgery. CJD manifests itself in hereditary acquired and sporadic forms, or for unknown reasons, which accounts for the majority of cases. “Based on the monitoring records of spongiform […]

Tags: , ,

Surgical treatment of gastric cancer: 15-year follow-up results of the randomised nationwide Dutch D1D2 trial

Posted on

Historical data and recent studies show that standardised extended (D2) lymphadenectomy leads to better results than standardised limited (D1) lymphadenectomy. Based on these findings, the Dutch D1D2 trial, a nationwide prospectively randomised clinical trial, was undertaken to compare D2 with D1 lymphadenectomy in patients with resectable primary adenocarcinoma of the stomach. The aim of the […]

Tags: , ,

Checklist optimizes timing of antibiotic prophylaxis

Surgical site infection (SSI) is an adverse event in which a close relation between process of care and outcome has been demonstrated: administration of antibiotic prophylaxis decreases the risk of SSI. In our tertiary referral centre, a SURgical PAtient Safety System (SURPASS) checklist was developed and implemented. This multidisciplinary checklist covers the entire surgical pathway […]

Tags: , ,

How clean is your knife?

A new fast-acting disinfectant that is effective against bacteria, viruses, fungi and prions could help to reduce the spread of deadly infections in hospitals, according to research published in the February issue of Journal of General Virology. Researchers from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin, Germany have optimised a rapid-acting, practical formula for disinfecting surgical […]

Tags: ,

Surgery on beating heart thanks to robotic helping hand

If you’ve been waiting for the day to arrive when computers actually start performing surgery, that moment might soon be upon us. A French team has developed a computerized 3D model that allows surgeons to use robotics to operate on a beating heart, according to a report in The International Journal of Robotics Research, published […]

Tags: , ,

New stem cell technology provides rapid healing from complicated bone fractures

A novel technology involving use of stem cells, developed by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers, has been applied to provide better and rapid healing for patients suffering from complicated bone fractures. The technology, involving isolation of the stem cells from bone marrow, was developed by Dr. Zulma Gazit, Dr. Gadi Pelled, Prof. Dan Gazit and […]

Tags: , ,

Surgeon ‘glues’ the breastbone together after open-heart surgery

An innovative method is being used to repair the breastbone after it is intentionally broken to provide access to the heart during open-heart surgery. The technique uses a state-of-the-art adhesive that rapidly bonds to bone and accelerates the recovery process. “We can now heal the breastbone in hours instead of weeks after open-heart surgery. Patients […]

Tags: , ,

Non-incision, endoscopic ulcer repair

Mayo Clinic surgical researchers are reporting a 93 percent success rate in recent animal tests of endoscopic repair of perforated ulcers. The goal is to advance the use of an endoscope — which allows access to organs through natural openings, such as the mouth — for a less invasive alternative to laparoscopic techniques (surgery performed […]

Tags: , ,

Technique distinguishes malignant tumor cells from healthy tissue in real time during surgery

Instead of the classic scalpel, surgeons can also operate with an electroscalpel. A significant advantage to this technique is that while a cut is being made, blood vessels are closed off and hemorrhaging eliminated. Now another advantage may be added as well: a German-Hungarian research team has developed a mass-spectrometry-based technique by which tissues can […]

Tags: ,

Washing away painful wounds

More than six million people in the U.S. suffer from persistent wounds — open sores that never seem to heal or, once apparently healed, return with a vengeance. The bedridden elderly and infirm are prone to painful and dangerous pressure ulcers, and diabetics are susceptible to wounds caused by a lack of blood flow to […]

Tags: , ,

Limb-sparing surgery may not provide better quality of life than amputation for bone cancer patients

Limb-sparing surgery, which has been taking the place of amputation for bone and soft tissue sarcomas of the lower limb in recent years, may not provide much or even any additional benefit to patients according to a new review. The analysis, published in the September 15, 2009 issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the […]

Tags: , ,

Endoscopic surgery effective as open surgery for nasal cancer

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have shown that endoscopic surgery is a valid treatment option for treating esthesioneuroblastoma (cancer of the nasal cavity), in addition to traditional open surgery and nonsurgical treatments. Esthesioneuroblastoma is a very rare cancer that develops in the upper part of the nasal cavity and thought to derive […]

Tags: , ,

Students embed stem cells in sutures to enhance healing

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering students have demonstrated a practical way to embed a patient’s own adult stem cells in the surgical thread that doctors use to repair serious orthopedic injuries such as ruptured tendons. The goal, the students said, is to enhance healing and reduce the likelihood of re-injury without changing the surgical procedure itself. […]

Tags: , ,

Perforated surgical gloves associated with surgical site infection risk

Posted on

Surgical gloves that develop holes or leaks during a procedure appear to increase the risk of infection at the surgical site among patients who are not given antibiotics beforehand, according to a new article. Despite substantial efforts to maintain sterile conditions during surgery, pathogens can still be transmitted through contact with skin or blood, according […]

Tags: , ,

Surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is often ‘too little, too late’

Posted on

A new study published by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reveals that one of the most common conditions caused by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is best treated surgically, sooner rather than later. Patients with RA frequently experience a debilitating condition known as metacarpophalangeal joint disease, which is usually treated by replacing the knuckle joints with […]

Tags: , ,

Posterior fossa exploration surgery provides best pain relief for patients with trigeminal neuralgia

Posted on

Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by episodes of intense, stabbing, electric-shock-like pain in areas of the face which have branches of the trigeminal nerve (lips, eyes, nose, scalp, forehead, upper jaw and lower jaw). The trigeminal nerve carries sensation from the face to the brain. In trigeminal neuralgia, the nerve function is disrupted. Approximately 15,000 new […]

Tags: , ,

Diseased heart valve replaced through small chest incision on 91-year-old patient

Posted on

When 91-year-old Irvin Lafferty was diagnosed with severe blockage of his heart valve—hardening that is formally known as aortic valve stenosis—open-heart surgery was out of the question. He’d already survived quadruple bypass while in his 50s, and having lived almost a century, Lafferty wasn’t a good candidate for heart surgery for many reasons. His local […]

Tags: , ,

MRSA pre-screening effective in reducing otolaryngic surgical infection rates

Pre-operative screening of patients for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) may be an effective way to reduce infection rates following otolaryngic surgeries, according to new research published in the January 2009 issue of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. The study, conducted by researchers at the Massachusetts Ear & Eye Infirmary, is the first to review […]

Tags: , ,

Innovative surgery provides new lease on life to dogs

Only six months after undergoing a unique and innovative surgery at Michigan State University (MSU), Jake – part dog and now part machine – spends his time working out on an underwater treadmill, traversing obstacle courses and prancing around pain free. Jake, an 11-year-old yellow Labrador retriever, was the first dog in the Midwest and […]

Tags: , ,

Sidebar