Tag Archives: Swine

Research on 3D scaffolds sets new bar in lung regeneration

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In end-stage lung disease, transplantation is sometimes the only viable therapeutic option, but organ availability is limited and rejection presents an additional challenge. Innovative research efforts in the field of tissue regeneration, including pioneering discoveries by University of Vermont Professor of Medicine Daniel Weiss, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues, hold promise for this population, which includes […]

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Genetic study demonstrates Israel’s wild boars originated in Europe

Wild boars look more or less the same in Israel as they do anywhere else: stalky and hairy with big heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. So scientists had no reason to suspect Israeli wild boars were any different than their brothers and sisters roaming the Middle East, from Egypt to Iran. Now, in a […]

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Veterinary scientists track the origin of a deadly emerging pig virus in the United States

Veterinary researchers at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech have helped identify the origin and possible evolution of an emerging swine virus with high mortality rates that has already spread to at least 17 states. A team of researchers led by Dr. X.J. Meng, University Distinguished Professor of Molecular Virology, has […]

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Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus variants with high pathogenicity, China

Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED), a serious and highly contagious swine disease, is characterized by severe diarrhea and dehydration in suckling piglets. The etiologic agent, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus (family Coronaviridae, order Nidovirales). The viral disease was discovered in the United Kingdom in 1971 and subsequently reported in many […]

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Pig-manure fertilizer linked to human MRSA infections

Pigs on industrial farms are known to harbour antibiotic-resistant bacteria. People living near pig farms or agricultural fields fertilized with pig manure are more likely to become infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria, according to a paper published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. Previous research has found that livestock workers are at high risk […]

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Flu vaccine backfires in pigs

Pigs vaccinated against H1N2 influenza were more vulnerable to the rarer H1N1 strain. Preventing seasonal sniffles may be more complicated than researchers suspected. A vaccine that protects piglets from one common influenza virus also makes them more vulnerable to a rarer flu strain, researchers report today in Science Translational Medicine. The team gave piglets a […]

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European hunter-gatherers owned pigs as early as 4600 BC

European hunter-gatherers acquired domesticated pigs from nearby farmers as early as 4600 BC, according to new evidence. The international team of scientists, including researchers at Durham and Aberdeen universities, showed there was interaction between the hunter-gatherer and farming communities and a ‘sharing’ of animals and knowledge. The interaction between the two groups eventually led to […]

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Rubber slat mats could improve animal well-being

New research shows that rubber slat mats could improve swine health. In a new study in the Journal of Animal Science, researchers in Europe studied how different types of flooring affects claw and limb lesions, locomotion and flooring cleanliness. According to the researchers, flooring is one of the main factors in production systems that cause […]

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Deadly pig virus slips through US borders

Researchers race to track spread of coronavirus. A lethal virus that causes diarrhoea and vomiting in pigs has entered the United States and has been found in 14 states. With the country’s US$97-billion pork industry standing to lose millions of dollars in the event of a mass outbreak, scientists are working to track the virus […]

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MRSA: Farming up trouble

Microbiologists are trying to work out whether use of antibiotics on farms is fuelling the human epidemic of drug-resistant bacteria. Pigs carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were found on US farms for the first time in 2007. The sight of just one boot coming through the doorway cues the clatter of tiny hoofs as 500 piglets […]

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Potential flu pandemic lurks: Influenza viruses circulating in pigs, birds could pose risk to humans

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In the summer of 1968, a new strain of influenza appeared in Hong Kong. This strain, known as H3N2, spread around the globe and eventually killed an estimated 1 million people. A new study from MIT reveals that there are many strains of H3N2 circulating in birds and pigs that are genetically similar to the […]

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Novel molecular type of Clostridium difficile in neonatal pigs, western Australia

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Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. Clostridium difficile is […]

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Hundreds of tiny untethered surgical tools deployed in first animal biopsies

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By using swarms of untethered grippers, each as small as a speck of dust, Johns Hopkins engineers and physicians say they have devised a new way to perform biopsies that could provide a more effective way to access narrow conduits in the body as well as find early signs of cancer or other diseases. In […]

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Feeding corn germ to pigs does not affect growth performance

Inclusion of corn germ in swine diets can reduce diet costs, depending on the local cost of corn germ and other ingredients. Recent research conducted at the University of Illinois indicates that corn germ can be included at up to 30 percent in diets fed to growing pigs. “In previous research, we had seen that […]

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Pig brain models provide insights into human cognitive development

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A mutual curiosity about patterns of growth and development in pig brains has brought two University of Illinois research groups together. Animal scientists Rod Johnson and Ryan Dilger have developed a model of the pig brain that they plan to use to answer important questions about human brain development. “It is important to characterize the […]

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Lipid researcher, 98, reports on the dietary causes of heart disease

A 98-year-old researcher argues that, contrary to decades of clinical assumptions and advice to patients, dietary cholesterol is good for your heart — unless that cholesterol is unnaturally oxidized (by frying foods in reused oil, eating lots of polyunsaturated fats, or smoking). The researcher, Fred Kummerow, an emeritus professor of comparative biosciences at the University […]

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Bacterial supplement could help young pigs at weaning age fight disease

A common type of bacteria may help pigs stay healthy during weaning. In a study of 36 weanling-age pigs, researchers found that a dose of lipid-producing Rhodococcus opacus bacteria increased circulating triglycerides. Triglycerides are a crucial source of energy for the immune system. “We could potentially strengthen the immune system by providing this bacterium to […]

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Stillbirth and neonatal death in piglets

Changes in the breeding of pigs over the last 20 years has led to the size of litters increasing by on average two piglets. This increase has resulted in piglets with a lower birth weight, which in turn can lead to an increase in piglet mortality. This poses a challenge to both animal welfare and […]

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Pig genome offers insights into the feistiest of farm animals

The pig and its cousin the wild boar have much in common with humans. They are world travelers. They’re adaptable, invasive and often damage their own habitat. They are easy to seduce (with food) and susceptible to domestication, but when conditions allow, they revert to a feral lifestyle. A new genomic analysis reveals some new, […]

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Pig geneticists go the whole hog

T. J. Tabasco is something of a porcine goddess at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where her ruddy, taxidermied head looks down from the office wall of geneticist Lawrence Schook. Now she has been immortalized in this week’s Nature — not by name, but by the letters of her DNA. Scientists are salivating. For the […]

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Pigs may look healthy but can test positive for flu at fairs

More than 80 percent of pigs that tested positive for influenza A virus at Ohio county fairs between 2009 and 2011 showed no signs of illness, according to a new study. Ohio State University researchers tested 20 pigs each at 53 fair events over those three summers and found at least one flu-positive pig at […]

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Scientists use new method to help reduce piglet mortality

To help increase the survival of newborn piglets, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have developed a new method that predicts animals’ mortality and nursing ability. Physiologist Jeffrey Vallet and his colleagues at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) in Clay Center, Neb., call the measuring technique […]

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Meeting pigs’ phosphorous requirements with fermented soybean meal

Fermented soybean meal (FSBM), considered a promising substitute for fish meal in weanling pig diets because of its protein content, lower cost, and lack of anti-nutritional factors, may have an additional advantage. University of Illinois researchers recently found that pigs digest the phosphorus in FSBM better than the phosphorus in conventional soybean meal. Most of […]

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African swine fiver sweeps across Russia

Russian authorities have incinerated tens of thousands of pigs and closed roads in the past few weeks, in an attempt to contain an emerging outbreak of African swine fever, a viral disease so lethal to the animals that it has been likened to Ebola. The spread of the disease comes with a heavy economic toll […]

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Antimicrobials alter intestinal bacteria composition in swine

Researchers from the University of Minnesota’s College of Veterinary Medicine, concerned about the use of antibiotics in animal production, have found that antimicrobial growth promoters administered to swine can alter the kind of bacteria present in the animal’s intestinal track, resulting in an accelerated rate of growth and development in the animals. Antibiotics are routinely […]

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Chilling methods could change meat tenderness

In a recent paper published in the Journal of Animal Science, meat scientists report that a method called blast chilling could affect pork tenderness. Researchers at the USDA-ARS, Roman L. Hruska US Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) recently conducted a study that compares pork longissimus muscle (LM) tenderness and other meat quality traits between different […]

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Hepatitis E virus in pork production chain in Czech Republic, Italy, and Spain, 2010

We evaluated the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in the pork production chain in Czech Republic, Italy, and Spain during 2010. A total of 337 fecal, liver, and meat samples from animals at slaughterhouses were tested for HEV by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, HEV was higher in Italy (53%) and Spain (39%) than in […]

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Piglets in mazes provide insights into human cognitive development

Events that take place early in life almost certainly have consequences for later cognitive development. Establishing the connections is difficult, however, because human infants cannot be used as laboratory subjects. Rodney Johnson and his collaborators have developed an alternative model for studying infant brain development. “Assistant professor Ryan Dilger and I became interested in establishing […]

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Aging heart cells rejuvenated by modified stem cells

Damaged and aged heart tissue of older heart failure patients was rejuvenated by stem cells modified by scientists, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences 2012, Scientific Sessions. The study is simultaneously published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research could one day lead to new […]

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Helping pigs to digest phosphorus

Phosphorus is a vital nutrient for pig growth, but pigs do not always digest it well. Research conducted at the University of Illinois has determined how adding various levels of the enzyme phytase to the diet improves how pigs digest the phosphorus in four different feed ingredients. Improving phosphorus digestibility has positive implications for producers’ […]

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