Tag Archives: Veterinary Public Health (Food Hygiene)

* Setting a dinner table for wildlife can affect their risk of disease

The findings, published in the journal Ecology Letters, have implications for human health and wildlife conservation, and contain practical suggestions for wildlife disease management and a roadmap for future study. Supplemental feeding–when people provide food to wildlife–is growing more common. As people move into previously undeveloped areas and habitat is lost to development or agriculture, […]

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‘Hidden’ emissions in traded meat calculated by researchers

An international team of researchers has, for the first time, estimated the amount of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) that countries release into the atmosphere when producing meat from livestock, and assigned the emissions to the countries where the meat is ultimately consumed. They found that embodied, or “hidden,” emissions in beef, chicken and […]

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Study finds fears that pet ponies and donkeys traded for horsemeat in Britain unfounded

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Fears that pet ponies and donkeys are being traded for horsemeat are unfounded, reveals research published online in the Veterinary Record. Buyers want larger size animals to obtain the maximum meat yield, so go for thoroughbreds and riding horses, the study indicates. The researchers looked at the animals put up for sale at seven randomly […]

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Vets and medical doctors should team up to tackle diseases transmitted from animals to humans

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A new study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) in Antwerp analyses the impact of animal brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTB) on animals and people in urban, peri-urban and rural Niger. The World Health Organization (WHO) ranks them as major zoonoses, infectious diseases transmitted between species. The research maps risk factors for transmission of […]

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The risks of antibiotic resistance and consumption: Learning with hands-on activities

An innovative laboratory-based summer project — Microbiology recipes: antibiotics à la carte — addressing antibiotic resistance and natural antibiotics has been shown to be an effective strategy to increase high school students’ awareness of antibiotic resistance and the relevance of rational antibiotic use. In contrast to traditional educational interventions, which mainly rely on large-scale information […]

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Chilling methods could change meat tenderness

In a recent paper published in the Journal of Animal Science, meat scientists report that a method called blast chilling could affect pork tenderness. Researchers at the USDA-ARS, Roman L. Hruska US Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) recently conducted a study that compares pork longissimus muscle (LM) tenderness and other meat quality traits between different […]

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Nunavik sled dogs need first aid and care too

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In Nunavik, there are many dogs — sled dogs, pets, and strays — but no veterinarian, so the University of Montreal International Veterinary Group has given Andréanne Cléroux, a veterinary student, the mandate to design and deliver a first aid guide for dogs in northern Quebec. “The problem relates mainly to animal health care, immunization, […]

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Influenza virus A (H10N7) in chickens and poultry abattoir workers, Australia

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In March 2010, an outbreak of LPAI A (H10N7) was identified in a biosecure intensive commercial poultry enterprise in New South Wales, Australia. For 8–14 days, 10–25 birds died each day, compared with the normal number of 2–6 birds per day. An egg production decrease of up to 15% was documented in the affected flocks. […]

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Buffalo bushmeat linked to brucellosis in Botswana

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Among the people of Botswana, the wild African buffalo is the burger of choice. But this bushmeat could be making consumers sick: the animals harbour a pathogen that can cause severe fever in humans. The same pathogen is also common in some populations of buffalo in the US. In 1974, researchers discovered that a bacterium […]

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Chicken as reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in humans, Canada

We previously described how retail meat, particularly chicken, might be a reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. To rule out retail beef and pork as potential reservoirs, we tested 320 additional E. coli isolates from these meats. Isolates from beef and pork were significantly less likely than […]

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Raw milk is a dangerous raw deal for farmers and consumers

On Feb. 2, health officials in Pennsylvania said at least 35 people in four states were struck with a bacterial infection after drinking unpasteurized “raw” milk, the same day a New Jersey legislative committee approved a bill to allow raw milk sales in that state. Martin Wiedmann and Rob Ralyea, Cornell University researchers and experts […]

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Organic meat not free of drug-resistant bacteria

If you’re paying premium prices for pesticide- and antibiotic-free meat, you might expect that it’s also free of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Not so, according to a new study. The prevalence of one of the world’s most dangerous drug-resistant microbe strains is similar in retail pork products labeled “raised without antibiotics” and in meat from conventionally raised […]

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High levels of MRSA bacteria in U.S. retail meat products

Retail pork products in the U.S. have a higher prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA) than previously identified, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Public Health and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. MRSA can occur in the environment and in raw meat products, and is estimated to […]

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Evidence supports ban on growth promotion use of antibiotics in farming

In a review study, researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine zero in on the controversial, non-therapeutic use of antibiotics in food animals and fish farming as a cause of antibiotic resistance. They report that the preponderance of evidence argues for stricter regulation of the practice. Stuart Levy, an expert in antibiotic resistance, notes that […]

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Expert calls for change in trans fat labelling

Not all trans fats are created equal and it’s time for nutritional labels to reflect that reality, says a University of Alberta nutrition expert. According to a scientific review conducted by Spencer Proctor, along with Canadian and international colleagues, natural trans fats produced by ruminant animals such as dairy and beef cattle are not detrimental […]

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‘Goat Plague’ threat to global food security and economy must be tackled, experts warn

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“Goat plague,” or peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is threatening global food security and poverty alleviation in the developing world, say leading veterinarians and animal health experts in this week’s Veterinary Record. They call on the UN Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) to turn their attention now […]

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US meat and poultry is widely contaminated with drug-resistant Staphylococccus aureus bacteria

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Drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteria linked to a wide range of human diseases, are present in meat and poultry from U.S. grocery stores at unexpectedly high rates, according to a nationwide study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) Nearly half of the meat and poultry samples — 47 percent — were contaminated […]

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Foodborne illness acquired in the United States—major pathogens

Estimates of foodborne illness can be used to direct food safety policy and interventions. We used data from active and passive surveillance and other sources to estimate that each year 31 major pathogens acquired in the United States caused 9.4 million episodes of foodborne illness (90% credible interval [CrI] 6.6–12.7 million), 55,961 hospitalizations (90% CrI […]

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Shellfish safer to eat thanks to breakthrough by Queen’s scientists

New technology to make shellfish safer to eat has been pioneered by scientists at Queen’s University Belfast. The new test, developed at Queen’s Institute for Agri-Food and Land Use, not only ensures shellfish are free of toxins before they reach the food chain but is likely to revolutionise the global fishing industry. While the current […]

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Stricter testing for federal ground beef program may not lead to safer meat

A new National Research Council report finds no scientific basis that more stringent testing of meat purchased through the government’s ground beef purchase program and distributed to various federal food and nutrition programs — including the National School Lunch Program — would lead to safer meat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) […]

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Feed likely source of Salmonella contamination on pig farms

Commercial feed appears to be a source of Salmonella contamination in commercial swine production units, according to a paper in the November 2010 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Moreover, nearly half of isolates found in pigs were multidrug resistant. The findings suggest that pork could be a source of human infection. They […]

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Salmonella test makes food safer, reduce recalls

Earlier this year, an outbreak of salmonella caused by infected eggs resulted in thousands of illnesses before a costly recall could be implemented. Now, University of Missouri researchers have created a new test for salmonella in poultry and eggs that will produce faster and more accurate results than most currently available tests. The new test […]

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Can naturally raised beef find its place in the industry?

As consumer demand for naturally raised beef continues to increase, researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered that naturally raised beef can be produced effectively for this niche market as long as a substantial premium is offered to cover additional production and transportation costs. Naturally raised beef is produced without hormones or antibiotics, whereas […]

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New method for detecting Clostridium Botulinum spores

The Institute of Food Research has collaborated in the development of a new method for detecting spores of non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum. This bacterium is the major health hazard associated with refrigerated convenience foods, and these developments give the food industry and regulators more quantitative information on which to base the procedures that ensure food safety. […]

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Turkey genome sequenced more than 90 percent, including sex chromosomes ‘Z’ and ‘W’

An international consortium of researchers has completed the majority of the genome sequence of the domesticated turkey, thanks in part to the efforts of Virginia Tech faculty members. The research team reports the results in the journal PLoS Biology, published by the Public Library of Science. “To date, more than 90 percent of the domesticated […]

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Salmonella contaminated pork may pose health risk for humans

German researchers have isolated a strain of Salmonella in pork that is closely related to the bacteria commonly found in chickens and linked to human food-borne illness. They report their findings in the July 2010 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. First emerging overseas in the mid-1990’s in pigs, initial studies showed the […]

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Keeping feces on the farm

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To your health! Dairy cows graze next to a spray irrigator on a New Zealand farm. Think dairy farm, and your mind may wander to images of cows grazing dewy green pastures, as glistening silos and red-walled farmhouses slumber in the distance. But something sinister is lurking in the grass: cow feces crawling with disease-causing […]

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Faster Salmonella detection now possible with new technique

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Using technology available through a local company, an Iowa State University researcher is working on a faster method to detect and genetically identify salmonella from contaminated foods. Byron Brehm-Stecher, an assistant professor of food science and human nutrition, wants to replace the current system of salmonella detection with a new approach that can provide DNA […]

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Protecting pigs, cultivating consumers

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The professor of swine health and production in the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine said that while producers have been busy putting food on plates, they have become distanced from the public. “Now we have few people farming, few farms raising hogs,” Dr. Davies said. “Our public is estranged from the livestock industry. […]

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Bluefin and bigeye tuna sushi contains mercury levels that sometimes surpass FDA limits

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Sushi lovers should think twice before ordering another helping of maguro rolls. Mercury levels in restaurant tuna sushi are higher than those of supermarket tuna sushi, a new study reveals. Mercury tends to concentrate in species at the top of the food chain; the larger the species, the greater the threat. That’s a worrisome fact […]

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